FALL 2004 ISSUE

IN THIS ISSUE:

Cuba inside out: Exploring Cuba’s unique urban, historical, architectural, and cultural landscapes

Women learn from revolution that they can lead in peace

Scientists model interaction of viruses and immune system

Rising above sweatshops: Management professors investigate and document innovative approaches to global labor challenges

Life in the fast lane enriches Virginia’s landscape

Graduate students are partners in research:
Winning graduate student research shows students inventing a device that allows them to do cell-compression research; tracking the course of a new virus that is infecting swine; studying how pesticides injure the brain; designing a gown in honor of a grandmother’s love of peacocks; discovering why students really skip class; exploring whether tobacco can be a pharmacy factory; questioning the source of children’s phobias


About the cover: Illustration by Kristin Loughlin, a student in one of two classes that provided art for the article, "Women learn from revolution that they can lead in peace." The Intermediate Graphic Design classes were taught by Michele Moldenhauer and Kristine Bailey.

Virginia Tech Research is a publication of the Office of the Vice President for Research.

Originally published in Fall 2004. Material appearing in the Virginia Tech Research magazine may be reprinted, provided the endorsement of a commercial product is not stated or implied. Please credit the researchers involved and Virginia Tech.

Virginia Tech does not discriminate against employees, students, or applicants for admission or employment on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, veteran status, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or political affiliation. Anyone having questions concerning discrimination should contact the Office for Equal Opportunity.

 


 

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