Opportunity Update

The Opportunity Update (OU) is a weekly newsletter of selected research funding opportunities, postdoctoral fellowships, graduate fellowships and notices about events and programs of interest to the Virginia Tech research community.

April 10th, 2009 | FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Although we have a good representation of this week's funding opportunities listed here, we could not possibly include every notice that might be of interest to everyone on campus. We suggest that you sign up for the Community of Science Funding Alert and consult the other resources available through this site.

Notices

National Science Foundation curriculum, lab improvement workshop to be held Tuesday, April 14 @ 2:00-5:00 p.m.

Burruss 325

A National Science Foundation (NSF) Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Web-Based Proposal-Writing Workshop will be held Tuesday, April 14, from 2 to 5 p.m. in 325 Burruss. This workshop will be led by Russ Pimmel, lead program director for the CCLI program, Division of Undergraduate Education at NSF. He has taught for more than 30 years in various areas of electrical, biomedical, and computer engineering. The Virginia Tech facilitator will be Bevlee Watford, associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Engineering.

The workshop will first present data from an analysis of the engineering proposals submitted in the CCLI Phase 1 competition in 2005 and 2006. The data identifies the most common strengths and weaknesses cited by the review panels in discussing these proposals. The workshop will then explore a systematic process for converting an idea into a competitive project. The interactive format will enable participants to develop an understanding of the data and to identify approaches for enhancing strengths and dealing with weaknesses as they develop their ideas.

The workshop will use a series of interactive exercises in which participants first reflect on their own understanding of the issue, then share these ideas in small groups and then again with the entire group, and finally hear an expert's opinion. Through this process, participants should develop a better understanding of the role that reviewers play in the proposal decision process; the factors that reviewers consider in processing proposals; and approaches for anticipating and responding to these factors. This will enable participants to prepare more competitive proposals for NSF's education programs and provide participants with a broader perspective on writing successful proposals.

Space in the workshop is limited. Interested faculty members should register at: https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1239065031234

The CCLI Phase One (Exploratory or Proof of Concept) proposal deadline is May 21. The program solicitation is available at: www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5741&org=DUE&from=home

Contact Beth Tranter at etranter@vt.edu if you have questions regarding the workshop.

Achieving Inclusive Excellence in Grant Proposals
Thursday, April 23, 2009 @ 9:00 a.m. - 12 Noon
Alumni Hall, Holtzman Alumni Center

The Virginia Tech Minority Serving Institutions Council in partnership with the Center for Academic Excellence and Enrichment, the Office for Equity and Inclusion and the Office of Research will present a special workshop entitled "Achieving Inclusive Excellence in Grant Proposals".

The event will begin at 8:30 a.m. with a continental breakfast and the workshop will commence at 9:00 a.m. and conclude by 12 Noon.

"Achieving Inclusive Excellence in Grant Proposals" will consist of two workshop sessions. The first will focus on ways that researchers can enhance the diversity and inclusive aspects of their grant proposals; and the second workshop will offer ways to build collaborations with Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) to submit joint grant proposals.

Both workshops will be presented by Virginia Tech faculty and administrators with experience at the National Science Foundation and other external funding agencies. Our colleagues will highlight best practices and models to enhance the quality of grant proposals.

The event is free and open to the entire University community. These sessions should be especially beneficial for those currently engaged in drafting proposals.

Please register via the following URL: https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1239018790631

 

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Farmers' Market Promotion Program
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS)

AMS provides competitive grant funds to agricultural cooperatives, producer networks, producer associations, local governments, nonprofit corporations, public benefit corporations, economic development corporations, regional farmers' market authorities and Tribal governments. The grants are targeted to help improve and expand domestic farmers markets, roadside stands, community-supported agriculture programs, agritourism activities, and other direct producer-to-consumer market opportunities.

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=p1b7JW1Rptl0lYv1jyCVsqQB29WxypStHZzNgQp9GQvyLzFbvPNh!
1092905380?oppId=46141&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW

Deadline:  April 27, 2009

Potato Research
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES)
Special Research Grants Program

The purpose of this grant program is to support potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) research that focuses on varietal development/testing and whose output will be or include potato varieties. As used herein, varietal development/testing is research using traditional and biotechnological genetics to develop improved potato variety(ies). Aspects of evaluation, screening and testing must support or complement the development of improved varieties.

For more information: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/fo/potatoresearchsrgp.cfm

Deadline: April 27, 2009

Commodity Partnerships for Small Agricultural Risk Management Education Sessions
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation

The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC), operating through the Risk Management Agency (RMA), announces the availability of approximately $900,000 (subject to availability of funds) for Commodity Partnerships for Small Agricultural Risk Management Education Sessions (Commodity Partnerships Small Sessions Program). The purpose of this cooperative partnership agreement program is to deliver training and information in the management of production, marketing, and financial risk to U.S. agricultural producers in small sessions. The program is to give priority to educating producers of crops not insurable with Federal crop insurance, specialty crops, and underserved commodities, including livestock and forage.

For more information: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46382

Deadline: May 11, 2009

U.S. Forest Service: Urban and Community Forestry National Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program - 2009 Special Focus Grant: Outreach
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Forest Service

This special focus grant will focus on funding for projects that provide scholarships to non-traditional/underserved participants.

The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (Council) serves to advise the Secretary of Agriculture on the status of the nation's urban and community forests. The Council seeks to establish sustainable urban and community forests, by encouraging communities of all sizes to manage and protect their natural resources. Well managed urban forests provide critical environmental services that can improve the public's health, and well being; economic viability and restore functioning environmental systems for people today and future generations. Through the U.S. Forest Service's Urban and Community Forestry competitive Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program, the Council only supports urban and community forestry projects that have national or multi-state, significance in their impact or application.

The definition used for Urban and Community Forestry is "The art, science, and technology of managing trees, forests, and natural systems in and around cities, suburbs, and towns for the health and well-being of all people."

Projects that have only a local impact and applicability will not be considered for funding. Urban and community forestry projects with a local scope of work should contact their State Urban and Community Forestry Coordinator for assistance in identifying funding alternatives at the local level.

For more information: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46347

Deadline: June 05, 2009

U.S. Forest Service: Urban and Community Forestry National Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program Special Focus Grant: Storm Event Protocol
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Forest Service

This special focus grant is for the development of a new storm event protocol that blends urban forest programs with emergency management operations. The purpose is to reduce the impact of storms on urban forests, lessen personal injuries and property damage, and decrease emergency management costs. The Storm Event Protocol is to be generic enough to address any natural storm event and national in scope to assist any community across the country.

The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (Council) serves to advise the Secretary of Agriculture on the status of the nation's urban and community forests. The Council seeks to establish sustainable urban and community forests, by encouraging communities of all sizes to manage and protect their natural resources. Well managed urban forests provide critical environmental services that can improve the public's health, and well-being; economic viability and restore functioning environmental systems for people today and future generations. Through the U.S. Forest Service's Urban and Community Forestry competitive Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program, the Council only supports urban and community forestry projects that have national or multi-state, significance in their impact or application. The definition of Urban and Community Forestry is the art, science, and technology of managing trees, forests, and natural systems in and around cities, suburbs, and towns for the health and well-being of all people.

For more information: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46347

Deadline: June 05, 2009

Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Competitive Grants Program
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES)

This AFRI RFA is announcing anticipated funding opportunities for fundamental research, applied research, education, extension, and integrated research, education, and extension projects. Applicants should note that there are substantial opportunities for conventional plant and animal breeding projects, both research and integrated, within AFRI. For plant breeding, see the Plant Biology: Environmental Stress program, the Plant Genome, Genetics, and Breeding program, the Applied Plant Genomics CAP program, and the Plant Breeding and Education program. For animal breeding, see the Animal Genome, Genetics, and Breeding program.

Projects supported by AFRI will propose single function research, education, or extension projects or multi-functional integrated projects. Award types include Research Grants, Education Grants, Extension Grants, Integrated Grants, Conference Grants, Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants, New Investigator Grants, and Strengthening Grants.

In FY 2009, the AFRI invites applications in the following programs in the Plant Health and Production and Plant Products area:

  1. Arthropod and Nematode Biology and Management
  2. Protection of Managed Bees Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP)
  3. Microbial Biology: Microbial Associations with Plants
  4. Microbial Genomics
  5. Plant Biology
  6. Plant Biosecurity
  7. Plant Genome, Genetics and Breeding
  8. Applied Plant Genomics Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP)
  9. Plant Breeding and Education

In FY 2009, the AFRI invites applications in the following programs in the Animal Health and Production and Animal Products area:

  1. Animal Genome, Genetics, and Breeding
  2. Animal Growth and Nutrient Utilization
  3. Animal Reproduction
  4. Animal Biosecurity CAP
  5. Animal Heath and Well-Being
  6. Integrated Solutions for Animal Agriculture

In FY 2009, the AFRI invites applications in the following programs in the Food Safety, Nutrition and Health area:

  1. Bioactive Food Components for Optimal Health
  2. Food Safety and Epidemiology
  3. Human Nutrition and Obesity
  4. Improving Food Quality and Value

In FY 2009, AFRI invites applications in the following area of programs related to Renewable Energy, Natural Resources, and Environment

  1. Air Quality
  2. Biology of Weedy and Invasive Species in Agroecosystems
  3. Managed Ecosystems
  4. Soil Processes
  5. Water and Watersheds
  6. Global and Climate Change
  7. Sustainable Agroecosystems Science and Long-Term Agroecosystem Program
  8. Enhancing Ecosystem Services from Agricultural Lands: Management, Quantification, and Developing Decision Support Tools

In FY 2009, the AFRI invites applications in the following programs in the Agriculture Systems and Technology area:

  1. Biobased Products and Bioenergy Production Research
  2. Nanoscale Science and Engineering for Agriculture and Food Systems

The AFRI cluster on Agricultural Economics and Rural Communities accepts applications to the following programs:

  1. Agribusiness Markets and Trade
  2. Agricultural Prosperity for Small and Medium-sized Farms
  3. Rural Development

For more information: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/fo/agriculturalandfoodresearchinitiativeafri.cfm

Deadline: Varies. The Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) encompasses several different programs. Important deadlines are summarized at the following URL: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/afri/afri_program_deadline_dates.html Applications must be received by 5:00 P.M. Eastern Time (ET) on the date detailed in the program description listed in the Program Opportunities section of the RFA. The Request for Applications for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) is now available. Previously, CSREES published a Program Announcement on December 17, 2008, providing an initial announcement about the administration of AFRI for FY 2009. The individual opportunity descriptions in the AFRI Request for Applications are consistent with those in the AFRI Program Announcement. Although no Letter of Intent deadlines have changed, some application deadlines have been modified to allow for the preparation and submission of applications.

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Fire Research Grants Program
United States Department of Commerce (DOC)
Technology Administration
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Measurement, Science and Engineering Research Grants

The Fire Research Grants Program will provide funding for innovative ideas in the fire research area generated by the proposal writer, who chooses the topic and approach. Financial support may be provided for conferences, workshops, or other technical research meetings that are relevant to the objectives of the Fire Research Grants Program. The program description and objectives for the Fire Research Grants Program are as follows:

  1. Fire Modeling Group: Develops and maintains advanced, validated numerical models to predict fire behavior with qualified accuracy. The Group develops models to simulate the spread, growth, suppression, and emission from fires in buildings and wildland-urban interface communities.
  2. Fire Measurements Group: Develops and applies measurement science to improve the understanding of fire phenomena including fire growth, fire-induced flow, heat transfer, smoke and species formation and transport, and fire suppression. The Group supports the development of innovative measurement and test methods, improved codes and standards, and fire model validation
  3. Fire Fighting Technology Group: Develops and applies measurement science to improve the understanding of the behavior, prevention, and control of fires. The Group enhances fire fighting operations, enables new technology to be integrated into fire fighting equipment, and supports fire investigations, fire reconstructions, and disaster response.
  4. Materials Flammability Group: Develops and applies measurement science to further the scientific understanding of material flammability. The Group enables the development of innovative materials through improved test methods and validated models of material flammability for application in the build environment.
  5. Engineered Fire Safety Group: Develops and applies measurement science to support cost-effective fire protection and risk-informed life safety decisions by the design, construction, and regulatory communities. Integrates the knowledge and tools necessary to assess building performance with respect to ignition, detection, suppression, toxicity, and egress in performance-based and prescriptive regulatory regimes.

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=6LpDJTFMJy6ZpfsSQfLQJRvxZnJh1xyLWFhZDTnJpDsl4hRrdLV3!-23300674?oppId=45413&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW

Deadline: Continuous. Applications will be considered on a continuing basis. Applications received after June 1, 2009 may be processed and considered for funding under this solicitation in the current fiscal year or in the next fiscal year, subject to the availability of funds. All applications, paper and electronic, must be received prior to the publication date in the Federal Register of the FY 2010 solicitation for the NIST Measurement Science and Engineering Research Grants Programs in order to be processed under this solicitation.

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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Advanced SynchroPhasor Research
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), Visualization and Controls (VC) Program, is seeking applications for innovative applied research and development (R&D) on the use of synchrophasor data to improve the reliability of the nation's electricity delivery. Applicants are asked to prepare a multi-year program application with a phased approach, Phase 1 being analytical (theoretical) studies, Phase 2 pilot or prototype studies and Phase 3 a large-scale or full-scale demonstration.

DOE has identified Technical Areas of Interest that the applicant should consider when preparing the application. Applicants shall include demonstration partner(s) as member(s) of the project team. This partner shall host and actively participate in Phase 2 and 3 work. The requirements for the demonstration partner are that the partner owns, controls, or has written permission to use the facilities proposed for Phase 2 and 3 work. Evidence of these qualifications shall be documented in the commitment letter provided by the partner.

The applicant may propose a three-phase project, or a project that starts with Phase 2 or Phase 3. To skip earlier phases, the applicant shall provide adequate documentation to demonstrate that sufficient work has been performed in the earlier phase. For example, if the applicant chooses to skip Phase 1, analytical studies, the applicant must justify and document that sufficient analytical work has been performed to support moving into Phase 2 or Phase 3 activities. If the applicant proposes both Phase 2 and 3, the demonstration partner can be different for each phase. Applications shall not duplicate existing projects in the DOE's Transmission Reliability Portfolio.

Applications shall address analytical studies and demonstration of technologies that would improve electricity reliability and market efficiency and that rely on data exchange among electric utility companies and other organizations from high-speed, time-synchronized measurement devices installed in electric power substations or at generation stations. Applications may include, but are not limited to, monitoring and visualization for improved control room operations, wide-area control and protection, power system restoration, and improved wholesale market efficiency. Applications across all Technical Areas of Interest will compete with each other; applications will not be divided into technology areas for evaluation and award.

The following are examples of the Technical Areas of Interest that applicants should consider when preparing their application; however, applications addressing other subject areas to improving synchrophasor data will also be considered:

  1. Monitoring and visualization for improved control room operations - use of synchrophasor data to provide early indication of grid problems (abnormal angle difference; inter-area oscillations; voltage stability); this will enable operators to assess stress on the grid, and take timely actions - in general, phase angle differences or the rate of change of the phase angle could be displayed as numbers, vector or bar graphs (using a reference angle), and/or angle-time curves; in addition, the phase angle display may be stand-alone or superimposed onto a network diagram
  2. Wide-Area Control and Protection - use of synchrophasor data to enable highly precise detection of islanding; phasor measurement unit (PMU)-facilitated coordination can allow a micro-grid to continue to operate in island mode until the utility grid disturbance is resolved, reducing the likelihood of a blackout
  3. Power System Restoration - use of synchrophasor data for timely and proper decision-making to bring equipment back into service without risking instability or unsuccessful reclosing attempts; this includes using synchrophasor data to directly measure system conditions, so that an operator would know if it is feasible to reclose the tie line or reconnect a substation; since use of synchrophasor data will increase the level of confidence in measured system conditions, it is a valuable tool for operators who are under pressure to reenergize the grid
  4. Improved Wholesale Market Efficiency - use of synchrophasor data to improve State Estimation (SE); use of synchrophasor data for real-time congestion management.

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46392

Deadline: May 27, 2009

Deadline note: Applications should be received by May 27, 2009, not later than 8:00 P.M. Eastern Time. Applicants are encouraged to transmit their application well before the deadline.

Airdrop - Advanced Personnel and Cargo Airdrop Systems
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Airborne force projection and aerial delivery methods are critical operational capabilities of the military's strategic shift toward a CONUS-based force. Increasing mission responsibilities now include humanitarian missions, and all types of aerial delivery applications from a wider range of air vehicles.

Airdrop science and technology is focused on

  • increasing aircraft/airborne force survivability in a threat environment by expanding the aerial delivery operational envelope;
  • improving airdrop accuracy through the introduction of standoff (of various levels) precision guided aerial delivery platforms and low level airdrop systems;
  • reducing personnel injuries/casualties by improving system functional reliability while reducing ground impact velocity, oscillation, and exposure time to threats; and
  • reducing the cost and time required for parachute development and production by new manufacturing techniques and using novel new parachute designs developed by computational analytical methods to reduce manufacturing and testing requirements.

An assessment of current personnel and cargo airdrop capabilities and ongoing research and development efforts versus future requirements has led to the following areas of interest:

  1. Cargo airdrop technologies should focus on precision aerial delivery for all cargo weights (1-42+Klbs) and varying ranges of off-set distances, including high glide and extended off-set powered systems
  2. Parachute ground releases used for all cargo weight ranges have limitations and do not always perform optimally under severe weather/terrain conditions - new more reliable, lower maintenance, lower weight and lower cost parachute releases are needed for cargo aerial delivery capable of automatically releasing parachutes from the cargo upon ground impact regardless of ground wind conditions and payload orientation
  3. Concepts and development of extraction systems for light through heavy (42Klb) payloads from transport aircraft
  4. New personnel parachute systems are needed to provide accurate delivery as well as low velocity landings coupled with ground wind attenuation to minimize body injuries; high glide and high off-set distance decelerator designs, along with high tech communication, video/audio, and global positioning systems are needed for steerable personnel parachute systems; in-flight communication systems for high altitude deployed paratroopers and HALO/HAHO navigation aid systems for SOF units; in addition, lightweight oxygen systems for high altitude deployed paratroopers
  5. Advanced construction methods for low cost manufacturing of all types of aerial delivery systems
  6. Development of interactive/electronic textiles for parachutes to monitor and improve aerial delivery system performance, such as canopy fabric structural behavior during inflation, variable porosity canopy fabric and/or cordage and variable glide ratio capabilities, fabric structural integrity indicator, and environmental-adjustable materials
  7. Modeling and experimental investigation of all the stages of parachute systems to include inflation and steady descent for modified round canopies, cross canopies, single-skin and ram-air parafoils, and new parachute design for high altitude and off-set precision aerial delivery of military payloads
  8. Advanced sensors, instrumentation and measurement methods to measure and investigate parachute aerodynamics and structural dynamics during opening and descent, including aerial delivery system spatial position, motion and geometry, fabric strain, opening force, air velocity, air pressure, and overall flow field
  9. Modeling and experimental research on the biomechanics of paratroopers during parachute deployment and landings, body protective devices to minimize body injuries, and avoidance measures for towed jumpers
  10. New Helicopter Sling Load (HSL) concepts that will reduce the ground personnel for hook-up, increased flight stability of HSL items, increase flight envelope while not modifying the current airframes
  11. Other aerial delivery applications with DoD and/or other U.S. Government applications to include aerial delivery from VTOL and UAS air vehicle systems

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Combat Feeding and Equipment Systems - Combat Food Service Equipment for Individual and Group Feeding
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Ideas, concepts, and technologies applicable to sustaining troops on the battlefield are needed for four general mission areas, consolidated large groups (550 troops), companies (150 troops), squads (12 troops), and individual Warfighters. Responsive proposals are directed towards minimizing the expenditure of energy, manpower, and other resources and materiel, and yet provide maximum flexibility and effectiveness in responding to the total food service requirements of troops operating under all battlefield threats, in all climatic and terrain conditions, and at all levels of commitment.

Generally, the requirements are for systems that can be rapidly deployed/employed; are easily transported; offer quick response times; are highly efficient (i.e., require least manpower, fuel, water, etc.); support all types of rations and menus; and, can be readily adapted to any battlefield scenario. As such, equipment must be compact, lightweight, versatile (e.g., modular, multi-functional, multi-fuel capability, etc.), energy efficient, reliable, and easily operated and maintained. In addition, effective field sanitation and waste handling/disposal concepts are needed.

Field feeding equipment and systems can be classified according to the following specific interest areas:

  1. Individual - Ration and beverage heating; ration and beverage chilling
  2. Group - Heat and serve; storage of perishable fresh and frozen foods; preparation of meals; transportation, distribution, and service; waste management, reduction, recycling, and conversion; sanitation; refrigeration

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Combat Feeding and Equipment Systems - Unit/Organization Equipment
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Unit/organizational and field service support equipment are required to sustain and increase the efficiency, survivability, and operational capability of the soldier in the battlefield while meeting individual needs. Equipment required to perform a variety of field functions must be efficient, reliable, compact, lightweight, easily operated/maintained, and logistically supportable. This equipment must also be rugged enough to withstand field transport, set-up under high stress conditions, repeated set-up and tear down, and drastically varying field conditions and climates. Future battlefield requirements dictate the need for more mobile, NBC survivable and multi-functional equipment in addition to the need to reduce the logistical burden of supplying water, fuel, and electrical power to the field.

Specific interest areas include the following:

  1. Mobile Laundry Systems
  2. Space Heaters for Tentage and Shelters
  3. Water Heaters for Laundry, Showers, and General Purpose Hot Water (including non-powered immersion type heaters)
  4. Field Clothing and Textile Repair Equipment
  5. Field Sanitation and Hygiene Equipment
  6. Non-Powered Field Lighting
  7. Mortuary Affairs Equipment
  8. Latrines and Incinerators for Human Waste Collection and Disposal in the Field
  9. Lightweight portable shower systems
  10. Field furniture
  11. Portable Field Waste Water Treatment/Recycling Systems
  12. Co/tri-generation technologies

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Combat Ration Research and Development
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Shelf-stable prepared combat rations are essential for enabling the individual Warfighter to perform assigned missions and to survive battlefield threats. The requirements for compactness, storage stability, protection, modularity, enhanced nutrition, Warfighter acceptance, convenience, and producibility have become even more stringent in anticipation of supporting highly mobile, widely dispersed Warfighters in climatic extremes. Combat ration functionality goals can be divided into the following specific interest areas:

  1. Storage stability with maximum quality and nutrient retention
  2. Production and distribution efficiency
  3. Consumption/acceptance enhancement
  4. Human performance optimization/enhancement
  5. Improved, enhanced and more effective protective packaging systems
  6. Collection and consolidation of quality assurance and environmental data
  7. Food safety and food security/defense

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements indicates the need to explore certain new areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities. These Scientific and Technical (S&T) Areas of Interest are in direct support of several operational/capability requirements defining the needs of the Armed Services on the future battlefield (Future Force). The S&T Areas of Interest also support the following main thrusts, including enhanced performance; energy and nutrient intake; nutrient stability; improved consumption rates; and reduced ration weight, source material, and waste.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Modeling and Simulation - Individual and Small Unit Performance and Survivability
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The Modeling and Analysis Team (MAT) has developed a simulation tool that will allow decision makers to tailor a Ground Soldier System that is operationally optimized across various missions, environments, and enemy threats. In simple terms, the MAT has built a robust quantitative tool that simultaneously considers multiple competing system constraints. The system, called the Infantry Warrior Simulation (IWARS), will support the integrated analytic simulation of individual Ground Soldiers and Ground Soldier small units to assess their potential survival and performance when equipped with current or proposed individual combatant clothing and equipment ensembles.

Although there are alternative approaches (e.g., field experimentation, laboratory tests) to assess operational effectiveness, they cannot provide the quantitative power, utility, ease of use, and full spectrum consideration of conditions that can be simulated with this modeling tool. These conditions include mission objectives, terrain, weather, lighting levels, ballistic casualties, heat stress, chemical agent threats, and other physiological factors. Consequently, the IWARS constructive simulation is necessary and nicely complements these other methods to provide Army decision makers with a comprehensive assessment capability that has been used to show the relative benefit of one proposed technology versus another.

Work has been accomplished to link IWARS to other analytic and training simulations using both Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocols (IEEE Standard 1278.1) and DoD High Level Architecture (HLA) approaches. A review of IWARS and other existing models and simulations has revealed the following areas of continuing scientific and technical interest:

  1. Using extant data and knowledge, development and implementation of methodologies and models to represent the effects of clothing, equipment and encumbrance on Ground Soldier task performance and operational effectiveness, such as movement restrictions or heat stress
  2. Using extant data and knowledge, development and implementation of methodologies and models related to the assessment of injuries and their impact on infantry task performance and operational effectiveness
  3. Using extant data and knowledge, development and implementation of methodologies and models to simulate the target detection, recognition, identification and acquisition process under various scenarios and environmental conditions
  4. Extend IWARS for human-in-the-loop operation to allow for the research and assessment of Ground Soldier cognition and behavioral representation
  5. Development of a capability to simulate communications and information transfer and the resulting impacts on individual situational awareness and small unit operations within the IWARS, to include a wide range of modes of information transfer, information elements, sensors, information technologies, and network systems
  6. Enhancement of the IWARS and associated supporting models to provide automated data communications with other standard U.S. Army and NATO analytic simulations and war games such as COMBAT XXI, OneSAF, and CAEn
  7. Development of tools and capabilities that allow simulation of the full spectrum of missions ranging from Stability and Support Operations (SASO) to combat
  8. Enhancement of human behavior and human system representation to provide improved battle command, situational awareness, and situational understanding to support data fusion and decision-making within constructive combat simulations
  9. Compilation, synthesis, and analysis of empirical data collected during field experiments and training exercises that quantitatively and qualitatively describe how Ground Soldiers move, shoot, communicate, sense and perceive, and decide during close combat and military operations in urban terrain (MOUT)
  10. Enhancement and generation of terrain databases that support the modeling of IWARS Ground Soldier behaviors and support linkages with other models, such as Combat XXI and OneSAF
  11. Development of methodologies and models to represent the effects of behavior and equipment on lethality, survivability, sustainability, mobility, and Command and Control

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

National Intelligence Community Enterprise Cyber Assurance Program (NICECAP) - BAA-06-11-IFKA
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Air Force (USAF)
Air Force Materiel Command

The U.S. Air Force has republished an announcement, originally made in 2006, for the National Intelligence Community Enterprise Cyber Assurance Program (NICECAP).

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL)/IF, in conjunction with the Disruptive Technology Office (DTO), is soliciting white papers for various scientific studies and experiments to increase our knowledge and understanding of the broad range of capabilities required in support of accountable information flow and large scale system defense. Solutions to basic research and engineering problems using innovative approaches are sought. The DTO National Intelligence Community Information Assurance Research (NICIAR) program seeks to advance knowledge that will trigger radical change, leading to a fundamentally more trustworthy, more usable, and more flexible IC cyber infrastructure.

For more information: http://www.fbo.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLRRS/Reference%2DNumber%2DBAA%2D06%2D11%2DIFKA/Attachments.html

Deadline: Continuous. It is recommended that white papers be received by the following dates to maximize the possibility of award: FY 08 should be submitted by January 25, 2008 FY 09 should be submitted by January 23, 2009 FY 10 should be submitted by January 22, 2010 White papers will be accepted until 2:00 P.M. on September 30, 2010, but it is less likely that funding will be available in each respective fiscal year after the dates cited.

National Protection Center
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The National Protection Center (NPC) is the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center's (NSRDEC) focal point for Homeland Defense and Homeland Security related dual-use RDT&E coordination, inter-agency collaboration, and project management/oversight. Through the NPC, the NSRDEC is responsive to DOD requirements to support the RDT&E needs of homeland defense and emergency responders, consistent with PL 107-314, section 1401 and a number of other inter-governmental RDT&E agreements.

Capitalizing on NSRDEC's and its allied partners core competencies, program activities include a number of RDT&E and technology transfer activities, such as gaps analysis; technology prioritization and planning; development of crosscutting requirements; development of concepts of operation and use; sharing of intellectual and physical resources; evaluation of multi-user requirements and interagency operating procedures; equipment standardization/standards analysis; doctrine analysis; technology vetting; Commercial and Government Off-the-Shelf (CoT/GoTs) assessment; implementation of best business practices; and RDT&E program execution where gaps have been identified.

The NPC oversees vetting practices, serves as multi-agency Senior Advisor, and provides Subject Matter Expertise supporting technology transfer of advanced protective technologies, integrated systems, collective protection, austere environment life support systems (shelter, feeding, command post, etc.), and personal sustainment (water, food, and feeding technology) for HLD/S operations.

This is accomplished by a multitude of activities that include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Technology Transfer
  2. Prioritizing, Managing and Funding Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) of individual or integrated personal protective materials or systems that support multi-agency/team project management and execution on behalf of the funding agency or organization
  3. Human Systems Integration
  4. Conduct Technology Assessments: Analysis in subject areas (e.g., ballistic protection) from the standpoint of deficiencies in standards, requirements, doctrine and technology and/or equipment both in the military and commercial sector, and make recommendations to overcome these deficiencies
  5. Market Analysis
  6. Product Test and Evaluation
  7. Network Services
  8. Customer Support
  9. Conferences

Specific areas of interest include the following:

  1. Proposals that address the process of improving public-private partnerships
  2. Proposals that provide approaches to identifying and addressing gaps and needs of the HLD/S operator
  3. Proposals that address potential areas of study, technology vetting procedures, interagency business practices, end item analysis, and development based on integrated concepts with high dual-use applicability
  4. Proposals that address product or process improvement
  5. Proposals that address market analysis, manufacturability, lifecycle management, etc., relevant to the transfer, adoption, implementation and use of the given technology or system of interest

These projects must be unique in nature (not proposed under other project areas), of high dual use value with the ability to span a multi-user base and that encourage/maximize public-private partnerships and academia participation. A path to transition the proposed work to commercialization must be part of the proposal. Affordability of end items or cost effectiveness of basic studies should be inherent in the proposals.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline:  Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Neuroepidemiology
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Epidemiological field research methodology and improvements in the assessment and early detection of adverse neurological health and performance risks are critical for protection of soldiers' health. The primary goal of the research program is to apply epidemiological field study methodologies to identify and better understand the adverse neurological health and performance risks associated with deployment operations and military service in general.

Areas of study to be addressed include feasible biomarker(s) of acute, chronic, and cumulative exposures to neurotoxicants present in the military occupational environment, field-tested techniques for the assessment of exposure to neurotoxicants (particularly chronic exposures), neurocognitive outcomes assessment, neurophysiologic markers of early effect, and long-term neurological health consequences of deployment and military service.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Tentage, Fabric Structures and Rigid Wall Shelters
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The objective is to enhance the protection and capability provided to Warfighters and Warfighter systems that use soft, rigid wall, and hybrid shelters. Threats include combat and the environment, and capabilities include mobility, transportability, durability and producibility. Research and development enhancements are grouped into seven primary thrusts areas. These are as follows:

  1. Ballistic Protection
  2. Chemical/Biological Protection
  3. Electromagnetic Interference/Electromagnetic Pulse Protection
  4. Environmental Protection
  5. Detection Avoidance
  6. Deployment/Durability
  7. Functional Integration of Multiple Technologies

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Textile Technologies - High Performance Bi/Tri-Component Fibers
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Bi/tri-component fibers can be defined as "individual fibers composed of two/three polymers of different chemical and/or physical properties extruded from the same spinneret, with various cross sectional geometries." Bi/tri-component fiber cross sectional geometries which include side-by-side, sheath/core, islands in the sea and segmented pie morphologies can be utilized to develop lighter, reactive/responsive fabrics that will make the wearer safer, more comfortable and higher performing. Bi/tri-component fibers can also be used in applications besides clothing, including soft shelters, parachutes, vehicles and numerous other textile applications.

Most commercial bi/tri-component fibers are used in commodity applications such as carpeting, automobile interior fabrics and filters. There has been very little work done in high performance or multi-functional fibers where specialty polymers (conducting, transparent, high strength, etc.) are co-extruded with metals, nanoparticles, optically active materials, etc., to make novel fibers and textiles with combinations of physical, chemical, optical, and/or electronic properties never seen before.

The Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) has acquired a bi/tri-component fiber extruder for processing thermoplastic materials that will be available for novel fiber research and development projects. There is a need for research and development of novel fibers to create woven and nonwoven textiles for Warfighter and first responder protection and sustainment. Specifically, novel optical, high strength, electronic, flame resistant and reactive (chemical, biological) fibers are of interest. Novel optical fiber research and development could involve efforts related to the creation of fibers for friend versus foe identification, optical communication systems, and optical sensing.

High strength fiber R&D should relate to the creation of melt processable fibers for soft and rigid armor, transparent fiber reinforced composites for transparent armor or structural composites for load carriage, shelters, or other Soldier System applications. Investigation of nanofibers produced through islands-in-the-sea technology for high strength, impact resistant composites is of interest. Electronic fibers for use in, for example, electrotextiles should be melt processable, conducting, shielded and durable. There is specific interest in developing a flame resistant elastomeric fiber that can be woven into an undergarment and wicks away moisture.

Reactive fibers could change chemically or physically to perform certain functions. An example of a physical change would be a fiber that coils or stretches in response to temperature changes. Chemically or biologically reactive fibers could sense and/or decontaminate chemical or biological hazards. It is conceivable to make fibers that combine several of the desired characteristics. For instance, a transparent fiber with the appropriate additives could sense and react to a chemical or physical change by sending an electronic message to the heads up display of the user, advising the user of a hazardous situation.

In addition to the fabrication of new bi/tri-component fibers, research efforts are needed to explore more fundamental issues such as delamination of the different polymers that could be used in the fiber, the use of compatibilizing additives and polymers, the dispersion of additives in the various polymers of the fiber, and the use of "migrating" additives to modify desired areas of the fiber. In addition, there is interest in devising new cross-sectional geometries that will enable or improve the performance of bi/tricomponent fibers for specific applications.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Textile Technologies - Multi-Functional Materials
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Textile technology programs relate to protection of the individual soldier against battlefield threats such as ballistic, soldier detection, chemical, biological, fire, thermal and directed energy, while ensuring survival under extremes of environmental (temperature and humidity) conditions by involving comprehensive research and engineering. In addition to threat survivability, there is a strong interest in the new and growing field of "wearables." The wearables field is of interest insofar as it relates to the integration of electronic capabilities in to textile materials, combat clothing and combat field equipment worn by Warfighters.

The following is a summary list of textile technologies of interest to the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center:

  1. Polymer synthesis and characterization
  2. Fiber morphology and mechanical property characterization
  3. High-strength fibers, i.e., fibers from liquid crystal polymers
  4. Yarn and fabric manufacturing, fabric preparation and finishing processes to provide enhanced protection and various functionalities, i.e., antimicrobial, insect repellant, moisture management technologies, etc.
  5. Photochemistry and photophysics of dyes and dyed textiles
  6. Methods for sorbing/reacting chemical warfare agents in lightweight, low-heat stress textile systems
  7. Producibility of unique fibers and fabrics
  8. Thermally resistant insulating textile systems
  9. New technologies for the characterization of textile systems properties (e.g., electrostatic, electromagnetic, durability; and flame, thermal and ballistic resistance)
  10. Consideration of comfort and physiological implications of protective clothing
  11. Polymer batteries and lightweight sources of power
  12. Power junctures and connections integrated in to textiles for access and supply of power to electronic components
  13. Connections for power and data wires to electronic components and sensors

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Advanced Technologies - Individual Warrior Technology
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Operational capability gap analysis has indicated that the following technical areas warrant research and development efforts:

  1. Individual cultural integration/interaction, to include language translation; medical support; interrogation/information collection/dissemination aids in coalition efforts; individual collaborative tools for coalition efforts
  2. Internal tactical communications and control for teams, for both close-in and distributed teams to include internal collaborative tools, displays, etc.
  3. Maintain situational awareness to both blue force and red force status (location, intent, capabilities, etc.) internal and external to team/squad/platoon
  4. Ability to locate, mark, illuminate and designate targets from extended ranges without detection
  5. Move, dismounted, over open terrain, natural and man-made obstacles, with large loads (100-300 pounds), without leaving a visible signature behind
  6. Individual power providing high energy density, and high current density
  7. Navigate to and from objectives in high threat areas without being detected, in all conditions of visibility
  8. Protect against improvised explosive devices, kinetic weapons, and fragmentation devices

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Advanced Protection and Integration Technologies and Systems
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

As protective and structural technologies get more advanced, opportunities emerge to integrate multiple functions into fewer layers and components. As the Army transforms over the next decade to a lighter, more agile and lethal force, the individual warrior's set of protective clothing and individual equipment must also transform. The Army is seeking a revolutionary approach to system design and integration using emerging technologies and technology trends. New and emerging technologies and design concepts must be explored to provide the warrior with combat overmatch through significant advances in survivability, mobility, and cognitive/physical warrior performance.

An advanced integrated combat uniform system will emerge as the foundational centerpiece for the human interface, load bearing, protection, and electronics hardware linkages for the future warrior systems. System weight and bulk reduction are key goals of this effort. Significant mission benefits to the soldier include longer mission time (endurance) in hot/cold, and/or chemical/biological environments; improved warrior performance, both physical and cognitive in all mission environments; reduced heat stress casualties; reduced water intake requirements; enhanced cold weather protection; and enhanced mobility due to reduced bulk and protrusion of electronic devices and interfaces.

The scientific and technical areas of interest are as follows:

  1. Research proposals to develop combat uniform and modular, integrated system design concepts and breadboard prototypes, to include integration of multiple technologies into fewer textile-based structures and/or system components - examples include, but are not limited to, integration of ballistic/blast protection and load bearing functions, integration of chemical/biological agent protection with environmental protection and signature management, integration of novel closure and interfaces for advanced protection and electronic networking capabilities, integration of power/data bus, sensors and connectors into textiles and other protective structures; design concepts and prototypes may address any and all portions of the body, e.g., torso, upper and lower extremities, neck, face, head - research is needed to address the needs of the full suite of soldier as a system variants such as the Core, Ground, Mounted, and Aviator; unique and novel design approaches for protective systems should be scalable and tailorable to meet multiple mission and threat scenarios
  2. Research proposals to advance the level(s) of protection or decrease the weight associated with protective clothing and equipment
  3. Research proposals for novel design approaches and technologies to provide enhanced passive physiological management, active ventilation, and/or heating and cooling concepts suited for dismounted soldier applications
  4. Research proposals to develop and implement measures, assessment tools and devices, and analysis of cognitive and physical warrior performance, especially as it relates to the soldier's body worn system and components; specifically, development of standardized test methods and devices that measure key performance parameters and user acceptability of protective systems are needed; test methods and standards that need to be developed include, but are not limited to, blast effects, blunt force trauma, armor material and system flexibility, mobility restriction due to worn equipment and surrounding/operational environment, load carriage capacity and balance, standard and emergency doff functionality, material aging, camouflage effectiveness, system modularity and integration.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies – Anthropometry
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The NSRDEC has traditionally maintained an extensive anthropometric database on U.S. Army and other military personnel. Anthropometric data are needed on Active Duty, National Guard, and Army Reserve personnel in order to facilitate the design and sizing of personal protective clothing and equipment systems. These data are also required for the design and layout of general-purpose workstations and combat vehicle crewstations. Virtually all military system development requires access to accurate body size data at some point in the design process. U.S. Army anthropometric data are also used by military contractors, other government agencies, and industry. The most recent anthropometric survey of U.S. Army personnel was conducted in 1988, and a need currently exists to update this information.

The scientific and technical areas of interest for this call are to

  • obtain traditional anthropometric measurement information on Active Duty, National Guard, and Army Reserve personnel in accordance with data collection standards established during the 1988 survey of U.S. Army Personnel;
  • develop and implement quality control measures to include data editing and other means that serve to ensure the accuracy of anthropometric data collected during the course of the survey;
  • develop data collection methods and procedures as required to support the acquisition of a well-defined set of body measurements that permit the assessment of anthropometric changes over time and also permit the comparison of U.S. Army personnel data with other U.S. and foreign military populations; and
  • traditional anthropometric data collection as well as three-dimensional whole body and body segment scanning of survey participants will be performed by the offeror.

Close coordination between the government and offeror on such matters as the final dimension list, body landmarking requirements, quality control implementation, and data cleaning shall be required throughout the duration of this large scale data collection effort. It is anticipated that a cost sharing contract will be used to execute this anthropometric data collection effort.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Anti-Terrorist Mobility Reduction Technologies
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Currently, there exists a need to limit the ability of enemy troops and terrorists to maneuver within the confines of secured buildings, check point areas and military installations. The objective of the Anti-Terrorist Mobility Reduction Technologies is to develop chemically-based coatings that act to modify the properties of military-relevant terrain, including concrete and asphalt, at low mass coverage. These coatings will be readily dispersible, reversible to restore the original properties, and readily removed from the terrain.

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities. Technology is needed for the following:

  1. Chemical coatings that modify military terrain surfaces
  2. Lightweight and easy to deploy
  3. Ability to cover a wide surface area and variety of floor and road materials
  4. Capability to withstand a variety of environmental conditions

A need also exists for the following:

  1. Novel modular designs and integration concepts to identify the best technical approach to provide mobility reduction technologies to the individual combatant against terrorist threats; such concepts should identify the mobility reduction capabilities offered for each component and area of the body/vehicle to be effected
  2. Unique and novel design approaches, which utilize currently fielded equipment as a base platform for incorporating improved mobility reduction technologies and would offer the user the ability to tailor the level of mobility to the current threat by adding or removing material(s)
  3. Unique and novel design materials for anti-terrorism which provide maximum areas of roadway/floor coverage and resistance to environmental conditions and traction improvement additives (sand, dirt, debris, etc.)
  4. Ergonomic and human factor studies to identify key parameters for user acceptability - the identified design(s) include studies, laboratory data and human evaluations for stability, ability to fire weapon systems, maneuverability and general mobility.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Ballistic Protection for Individuals
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Ballistic protection for the individual soldier involves protection of the body (head/neck, torso, extremities) against a variety of projectiles that differ widely in shape, size and impacting velocity. New materials and systems are required to meet these broad ballistic threats and to lighten the load carried by the soldier. A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities.

Technology is needed for

  • new polymers that can provide increased tensile properties, increased ballistic protection and lighter weight;
  • highly ordered polymers, e.g., liquid crystals, for High Performance (HP) fibers; and
  • improvements to existing HP fibers (e.g., surface modification, processing and composition variations).

A need also exists for the following:

  1. Novel concepts to identify the best technical approach to provide protection to the individual soldier against multiple ballistic threats - such concepts should identify ballistic defeat mechanisms for fragmentation and handgun threats; upon identification of and understanding defeat mechanisms, further efforts should establish the feasibility of systematically combining those mechanisms into lightweight, flexible, minimum-bulk structures of one pound per square foot or less providing a high level of protection against the identified threats
  2. Unique and novel textile and composite structures which optimize the ballistic protection of currently available materials for soft body armor and helmet applications
  3. Studies of blast effects to include overpressure and behind armor effects on the individual and materials/systems to mitigate effects
  4. Novel concepts to identify the best technical approach to provide ballistic protection to the individual soldier against multiple ballistic threats - such concepts should identify ballistic defeat mechanisms for current ballistic threats including small arms threats and flechettes; the small arms threats range from 5.45mm to 7.62mm ball and armor piercing (AP) with limited interest in 12.7 mm AP; upon identification of defeat mechanisms, further efforts should establish the feasibility of systematically combining those mechanisms into lightweight, minimum-bulk structures using unique and novel textile and/or composite systems
  5. Additional concepts may include transparent armor, smart materials for armor and other functionalities, and nanotechnology approaches to new materials

Some of the technical approaches for topics within this solicitation may be subject to export control restrictions under existing export control laws, and or required to be conducted as classified projects as outlined in the National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) and its supplements. Contractors who would like to submit proposals pertaining to such technologies are encouraged to contact their local Defense Investigative Service (DIS) Industrial Security representative or the Technical POC listed in the solicitation for guidance.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies – Biomechanics
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Biomechanical tools and data are currently being developed to inform the design of boots, individual body armor, and load carriage gear that reduce injuries, delay fatigue and enhance dismounted soldier mobility. There is a need for detailed information on the forces acting on the soldier's musculoskeletal system as well as how their gait, range of motion, rates of movement, energy expenditure, and stamina are affected by their load, its distribution on the body, the terrain and grade of the environment, and obstacles presented by the environment, such as in urban terrain.

A review of the existing data and models has revealed the following areas of continuing scientific and technical interest:

  1. Development of light weight, low powered prototypical devices that improve the mobility of individual dismounted (non-vehicular riding) soldiers in complex terrain and enhances their ability to carry heavy loads with reduced stress on the body and less fatigue
  2. Development of a suite of biomechanical tools that may be used to assess the physical performance characteristics of soldier systems of dismounted soldiers in a broad range of environments
  3. Determine to what degree the biomechanical measures of fatigue may be used to predict performance failure of critical soldier tasks
  4. Develop predictive fatigue algorithms and integrate them with physiological monitoring systems to provide commanders with real time information on the performance capabilities of their soldiers
  5. Investigate the effects of acute and chronic head borne weight on soldier performance, fatigue and the incidence of injuries
  6. Develop physics based data and analytic models/virtual prototyping tools of human locomotion and combat environment individual movement techniques (IMTs) to provide design guidance for individual soldier equipment
  7. Determine the biomechanical effects of placing loads of varying mass, volume and location on the extremities during typical soldier tasks
  8. Develop data collection methods to support the acquisition and analysis of marker-less kinematic data accurate and suitable for use with a variety of soldier clothing and individual equipment, and for a range of soldier activities

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies – Biotechnology
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Biological processes and systems have evolved efficient responses to pressures in the environment. The science of biotechnology identifies those processes and systems which can be manipulated for enhancement of current technologies, or development of new ones. The needs of the Warfighter in the field - enhanced protection from chemical and biological agents, lightweight clothing and gear, real-time detection and identification of enemy agents, and energy creation and storage, can be served by research in this growing field.

A comparison of current capabilities versus Warfighter needs leads to interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities:

  1. Novel biologically-based biocides for the generation of antimicrobial materials with nonleaching killing actio
  2. Experimentation and theoretical research into the structural interactions and mode-ofaction of peptides at interfaces
  3. Development and enhancement of sensor technologies for chemicals and biological materials
  4. Environmentally benign processes (i.e., low temperature and pressure, aqueous, pH 7) for production of materials
  5. Novel approaches to stabilizing enzymes and natural dyes for long-term use in a broad range of environments
  6. Real-time generation of biofuels from renewable resources
  7. Novel environmentally-friendly FR materials from renewable biological sources
  8. Development of improved antimicrobial and antisporal test methods

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Body-Worn Interactive Materials
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Electronic subsystems, devices, and sensors are being miniaturized for personal use. Novel materials, technologies, and manufacturing methods are needed to integrate these electronics into textiles, protective clothing, or combat field equipment. There is an interest in the development of textile-based conductive materials and integration of these materials and electronics into textile clothing and individual equipment to provide multiple performance enhancements. Desired materials and products shall be safe to wear, lightweight, flexible, launderable, resistant to corrosion and water contamination, and durable to wear and tear. In addition, novel materials providing sense and respond, or actuation capabilities, power generation, or radio frequency tagging are of interest.

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities. Technology is needed for the following:

  1. New fiber forming polymers that provide conductive, radiative or optical performance - conductivities of conductive fibers should approach that of metals for power/data transmission applications
  2. Responsive fibers and fabrics that can sense and respond to a particular stimulus
  3. Novel manufacturing processes to integrate electro-optic fibers, yarns, films, and materials into fabrics - these processes should be capable of large-scale production of the materials
  4. Techniques to integrate or mount battery powered wireless or wired sensors or other miniature electronic devices into or onto fabrics or other individual equipment
  5. Development of ergonomic connector technologies to attach/detach electronics, sensors to/from network
  6. Methods to translate standard cabling such as USB 2.0, Firewire (IEEE 1394), and Coaxial cables into flat, lightweight, flexible, wearable textile-based conductors
  7. Integration methods of textile based body worn antennas into protective clothing and equipment
  8. Novel wearable power generation technologies to provide minute battery charging capabilities or to provide for direct power of low consumption miniature electronic devices
  9. Lightweight Electromagnetic Interference/Radio Frequency (EMI/RF) shielding capabilities for wearable electronic components and conductive networks
  10. Radio Frequency tagging for technical applications such as local positioning within a building and for inconspicuous data storage and collection
  11. Development of ergonomic computer input devices for handware of other clothing items

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Chemical/Biological Protection for Individuals
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The protection of the soldier from exposure to hazardous chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents, is essential to mission accomplishment on today's battlefield and that of the future. This protection is currently accomplished through the use of an activated carbon system, the use of semi-permeable material systems, and the use of impermeable barrier materials. The activated carbon system is used in protective overgarments and affords protection by adsorbing hazardous chemicals. The impermeable barrier materials consist of rubber, coated, and multilayer laminate fabrics found in gloves, boots and special purpose (e.g., depot storage/demolition/explosive ordnance disposal ensembles), which afford protection by acting as a physical barrier to chemicals.

Future needs for chemical-protective uniforms require that they protect against multiple threats, including toxic aerosols and biological agents, be decontaminable and reusable. These uniforms must also be comfortable in all climates and not impair the mobility or performance of the soldier. The materials for these uniforms should be lightweight, have improved protection for resistance to liquid, vapor, and aerosol CB agent penetration, lessen the propensity for heat stress, have increased durability and shelf life, and be reusable through the use of reactive and biocidal materials that will detoxify the chemical warfare (CW) agents without adverse reaction with the skin.

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities:

  1. Novel materials and concepts that could provide protection against highly toxic compounds, including toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) and military offensive chemical agents (blister, nerve, etc.) in gross contamination amounts for extended periods (greater than four hours), and biological agents
  2. Proposals for a low cost service life indicator that can be worn or stored inside a chemical protective garment package to visibly display or provide some reading as to the degree of protection remaining in the garment are of interest as are applications of novel polymers and smart materials
  3. Research proposals to reduce/minimize the need for live agent testing to verify the chemical protection of current carbon based sorptive systems
  4. A research proposal on advanced semi-permeable or selectively permeable membrane technology that allows selective permeation of moisture while preventing penetration of chemical and biological warfare agents in the forms of liquid, vapor, and aerosol
  5. Garment design and novel closure systems for CB protective clothing system - elastic/stretchable polymeric materials such as thermoplastic elastomers for development of closure systems that provide and maintain chemical/biological agent protection in normal and in stretched states
  6. Proposals to investigate mechanisms and garment treatments that capture and possibly react with aerosolized (<5micron) threat particles
  7. A research proposal for improved outer shell materials for CB protective garments - materials with novel surface modification to either its fibers or the fabric, resulting in an air permeable water repellent material for the life of the garment
  8. Proposal for improved protection against radiation threats - an example would be concern for the potential risk of collateral "E" bomb exposure; the high frequency pulse emitted by these devices might overwhelm traditional shielding methods, thus there is an interest for unique nanotechnologies, or other approaches, that offer some protection against X-ray and low-energy Gamma emissions that could be modified to offer supplemental lightweight shielding for high value electronic equipment worn or carried by the Warfighter
  9. A research proposal for waterproof and solvent resistant slide fasteners as well as slide fastener test apparatus for CB agent resistance

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies – Countersurveillance
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Survivability is fundamental to the conduct of warfare. The countersurveillance mission is to enhance the survivability of the Warfighter on the battlefield by providing textiles for uniforms, individual equipment and paints and textiles for exposed skin that reduce detectability by various sensors. These sensor threats include the eye, near-infrared image intensifiers, short-wave infrared devices, thermal imagers, radar and multi-spectral sensors.

Signature suppression with textile and skin camouflage materials usually take the form of dyes/pigments, additives and coatings, although novel and innovative solutions are encouraged. Thermal countermeasures must not degrade existing countermeasures for visual and near-infrared (NIR) protection. They should be passive, hypo-allergenic and not increase the bulk or heat stress over levels currently imposed by existing clothing systems.

Analysis of user requirements and current capabilities indicate the need for near and far term research proposals related to novel concepts and materials that

  • defeat the threat of short-wave infrared devices;
  • defeat the threat of thermal sensor detection;
  • defeat the threat of radar detection;
  • defeat multispectral threat sensors;
  • provide novel camouflage solutions to current and future sensor threats by exploring the applicability of a wide variety of technical approaches without compromising visual and NIR; and
  • provide protection to exposed hands and facial areas to defeat multispectral sensor detection.

In addition, exploratory development proposals related to the above areas under which the feasibility of such proposals may be demonstrated are sought.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Flame and Thermal Protection for the Individual Soldier
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Flame and thermal protection for the individual soldier involves protection of the body, face and hands against a variety of fire threats and hazards including those attributed to improvised explosive devices that occur in combat (rural and urban warfare), operations other than war, and standard operational duties. New, low cost, effective materials are needed to protect against these threats and hazards to reduce burn injuries, as well as new test methods and prediction models.

A comparison of current capabilities versus battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities:

  1. New, low cost fibers for clothing applications (woven, nonwoven, knit, and batting fabric structures) which provide flame and thermal resistance without melt drip characteristics
  2. Improvements to existing fibers (e.g., incorporate novel flame retardant chemicals, flame suppressors or char formers into conventional low cost fibers), fiber variants
  3. Novel concepts and approaches to integrate multiple protection capabilities into materials and clothing systems - such concepts should integrate flame and thermal protection with other protective capabilities such as environmental protection, signature management, comfort, and electrostatic dissipation without significantly increasing weight
  4. Novel development of flame resistant treatments, coatings, and films that are moisture vapor permeable, lightweight, and chemically compatible with a wide variety of substrate materials
  5. Test methodology and supporting instrumentation to characterize and evaluate the melt burn potential of thermoplastic fiber-based fabric in layered configurations at either the bench scale or full instrumented manikin system level
  6. Novel commercial environmentally friendly flame retardant chemical treatments and processes for synthetic and natural fibers
  7. Scientific information on the effect of material type and location within the clothing system configuration on burn injury
  8. Studies on the thermal or combined thermal and blast effects on the individual and clothing system configuration
  9. Technology to reliably simulate and record the high thermal or combined high thermal and blast effects within a laboratory environment at the bench scale or full scale clothing system level
  10. Scientific information/innovative technologies leading to the development of highly durable instrumented fire manikins and reliable and accurate thermal sensors
  11. Scientific information and studies on models and prediction methods for burn injury effects or the combined burn/blast injury effects
  12. Novel concepts to provide flame and thermal or combined thermal and blast protection through active mechanisms such as smart materials that sense and respond or other active systems that respond to an external or internal stimulus

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Future Warrior Technology Integration
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

As the Army transforms to a lighter, more agile, and lethal force, a revolutionary approach to system design and integration is needed consisting of open system architectures to provide lightweight, system-engineered, integrated modular protective combat ensembles employing plug and play components. New technologies and design concepts must be explored to provide the warrior with combat overmatch through revolutionary advances in survivability, mobility, networked communications, collaborative situational awareness, power sources, and networked lethality/fire control while enabling extended combat missions with reduced loss in physical capabilities from fatigue, stress, and hardship.

Proposals are needed to integrate, mature, and demonstrate innovative ballistic and blast protection solutions to provide increased protection against evolving bullet, fragmentation, and blast threats through an architecture that integrates weight reduction, anthropometry, modularity, and tactical gear packaging to increase mobility and reduce stress. Examples include

  • develop multiple impact survivability concepts for torso and improved protection for head, face, and extremity; and
  • mature and integrate advanced fiber, polymer, ceramics, nano and/or composite material technologies for ballistic and blast protection.

Proposals are needed to integrate and demonstrate innovative integrated solutions in the areas of tactical concealment and multispectral signature reduction, and protection against flame, lasers, chemical, biological, and toxic industrial chemicals and materials. Technology options include selectively permeable membranes, flame resistant fibers, fabrics and treatments, and nanotechnology based materials.

Proposals are needed to integrate and demonstrate novel design approaches and technologies to provide body worn enhanced passive, active, and hybrid thermal management (optimized for weight and power reduction). Examples include body worn ventilation and filtration systems; incorporating active microclimate cooling with body armor and Chemical-Biological protective suits; incorporating active ventilation with headgear protection; and semi-permeable and moisture wicking membranes/fabrics for improved temperature and moisture management.

Proposals are needed to mature, integrate, and demonstrate soldier mobility and load carriage solutions to include exoskeleton, lower extremity load carriage devices and advanced materials for load carriage applications that reduce system size, weight and metabolic energy costs and enhance mobility while optimizing soldier fighting and sustainment loads.

Proposals are needed to mature and integrate soldier and Small Combat Unit (SCU) networking technologies with soldier information awareness systems and emerging tactical networks. The goal is to maintain compatibility and interoperability of unique platoon, squad, and individual soldier information requirements with company and higher Command and Control (C2), and Situational Awareness (SA) infrastructures. Technology solutions include reliable jam-proof wireless technologies and advanced cabling and connectors to include e-textiles and micro/nano connectors to enhance personal area networking between head, body, and weapon systems.

Proposals are needed to integrate, mature, and demonstrate innovative soldier power and energy solutions to soldier system. The goal is to provide higher power and energy density sources for ground and mounted soldiers. Examples include direct and reformed methanol fuel cell, conformal low-profile rechargeable battery, enhanced zinc-air battery, and platoon/squad level generator/charger.

Proposals are needed to mature, evaluate, and integrate Small Combat Unit (SCU) lethality concepts and technologies to include small unit cooperative engagement for more accurate firing solutions, common net-centric SOSCOE compliant Fire Control and body-worn gunfire detection solutions.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Advanced Technologies - Information Operations
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Information Operations to include Computer Network Operations and Electronic Warfare has had a dramatic impact on the battlefield in recent years; permitting commanders and Warfighters to leverage technology as a means to improve awareness and decision making during operations planning and execution. This area of the battle space is largely technology driven and tied directly to the commercial communications industry. Changes in commercial industry standards and technologies require constant vigilance on behalf of the government for development of advanced Information Operations equipment and software.

Efforts are underway to leverage software development and hardware integration to address any emerging threats in the following areas:

  1. Computer Network Operations
  2. Electronic Warfare

Concept papers and proposals are requested in the following areas and are not necessarily limited to the specific area of interest indicated:

  1. Computer Network Operations as defined by the Department of Defense
  2. Electronic Warfare in a Tactical Application
  3. Electronic Warfare as defined by the Department of Defense
  4. Targeting within Information Operations
  5. Integration into UAV and other Aerial Platforms
  6. Use in Ground Platforms
  7. Use as Handheld/Man packable Form Fit and Function
  8. Testing of the above mentioned technologies

Additionally, technology candidates must exhibit the following:

  • Technical Readiness level 1--7

The Development Timeframe for this effort is between July 2008 and September 2011.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Integrated Protective Headborne Equipment and Injury Diagnostic/Assessment Tools
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Head borne protection for the individual combatant involves protection of the head (to include the eyes, neck and throat) against fragmentation munitions, handgun projectiles, blunt trauma impact, and behind armor effects including injuries caused by kinetic energy and blast waves. New materials, designs including modeling and simulation design tools, survivability models, treatments and diagnosis technologies are required to meet this broad range of threats while also providing in-depth consideration to the appropriate ergonomics, comfort, hearing, mission requirements, thermal/vapor management and other cognitive functions necessary for the combatant to fully execute his/her operational duties without extensive physical or mental impairments.

New diagnostic and assessment tools/methods that medically evaluate the combatant are needed in order to more fully characterize specific warrior populations at risk and requiring further clinical intervention. In order to support this requirement new diagnostic and assessment methods and tools for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) are required. In addition, research data needs to be collected in a systematic manner for the various services, compiled and analyzed in order to develop a baseline for a requirements document. The injury data is a key element in developing treatment and diagnosis tools and new protection/survivability models so that troops maybe better protected in future engagements and injuries treated at the front lines.

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities. Technology is needed for

  • new and improved polymers for fiber reinforced plastics and resins which can provide increased ballistic protection and lighter weight;
  • new fibers and materials for energy absorption and moisture vapor permeability/cooling management;
  • transparent materials for enhanced eye protection without reductions in visibility;
  • improved lightweight integrated communications devices;
  • engineering designs which incorporate enhancements to combat helmets including area of coverage, field of view, modular attachment points, speech recognition, and compatibility with existing equipment and improved hearing capabilities;
  • modeling and simulation tools for material/armor system designs; and
  • modeling and simulation survivability design tools including bio-mechanics and injury prevention/diagnosis models.

A need also exists for the following:

  1. Novel modular designs and integration concepts to identify the best technical approach to provide head protection to the individual combatant against multiple ballistic and nonballistic threats - such concepts should identify ballistic protection capabilities for each component and area of the head to be protected; upon identification of critical design elements further efforts should establish the feasibility of systematically combining those modular components into a lightweight head borne system of approximately three and a half pounds providing a high level of protection against the identified threats and high level of user comfort
  2. Unique and novel design approaches, which utilize the currently fielded equipment and developmental items as a base platform for incorporating modular components for improved ballistic/blast protection and would offer the user the ability to tailor the level of protection to the current threat by adding or removing modular integrated components (i.e., face shield, eye protection, neck protection)
  3. Unique and novel design approaches for protective assemblies, which provide maximum area of coverage and ballistic resistance capabilities - these systems could weigh as much as six to eight pounds and encompass the entire head; this type of approach will require attachment designs and bio-mechanic studies to determine the best means for carrying the system weight on the shoulders or other parts of the body and be capable of allowing the user to tailor the level of protection to the anticipated threat by adding or removing modular integrated components
  4. Ergonomic and human factor studies to identify key parameters for user acceptability - the identified design(s) include studies, laboratory data and human evaluations for heat stress retention, stability, ability to fire weapon systems, maneuverability and general form, fit and function of proposed design
  5. Modeling and simulation design and material evaluation tools which provide engineers and medical personnel the appropriate human interface information necessary to mitigate injuries from a variety of threats encountered on the modern battlefield
  6. Characterization and surveillance of, and mitigation of, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), primarily within military personnel
  7. There is a need to match evidence-based services to the needs of deployed personnel, and to allow the Navy Surgeon General and the Medical Officer of the Marine Corps to provide accurate psychological health information; specifically, there is a critical need for surveillance to determine the prevalence of psychological health problems and TBI in expeditionary Sailors and Marines, particularly in high-risk populations such as infantry
  8. Other topics pertaining to psychological health relevant to TBI are develop a core body of knowledge in compassion fatigue; evaluate the need for telemedicine; educate professional on those affected by disease or addiction; develop course on how to use pharmacotherapy treatment and non-pharmacological intervention; standardize a Neurocognitive and Combat Stress Toolbox; develop a portable head-neck CT scan for use in patient transport; study ocular signs of TBI; develop the Navy Reserve's Psychological Health strategic plan; develop critical skills related to individual and family emotional regulation, problem solving, communication, and accessing support; develop assessment and treatment program for the families of Wounded Warriors; develop an outreach program for Marines; provide mental health case managers and oversight for each Wounded Warrior Battalion; train support staff at USMC HQ; enhance knowledge and skills on non-mental health caregivers to recognize combat related symptoms; train mental health providers on the techniques and interventions necessary to decrease combat operational stress; provide on-site training for OSCAR team members prior to deployment; investigate negative expectations about disclosing combat experiences; develop website for self-management intervention employing empirically derived cognitive-behavioral therapy; develop pre-deployment training for psychological first aid; etc.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Lightweight Conformal Solar Cells
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

The power incident from the sun, at the earth's surface, is on the order of 1kW/m2. Conversion of this power, even at moderate efficiencies could be a major renewable, clean and inexpensive energy source, there for the taking. The operation of solar cells is based on the photovoltaic effect, which is the generation of a voltage and/or current by absorption of light in certain materials or combinations of materials. To date, the primary materials that have found commercial application are a variety of inorganic materials including silicon (crystalline, multicrystalline and amorphous), copper indium diselenide, indium phosphide and gallium arsenide, with cell efficiencies averaging around 18-20 percent.

These materials however remain limited because of high cost and inability to process them into lightweight, conformal devices. Therefore, much research has been devoted to the development of new materials that can address these limitations and further improve device efficiencies. It is well known that organic materials can offer lower cost, lower weight, facile processability and tailorability of the photoelectric response. However, the efficiencies of organic based devices are currently too low for practical use. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells composed of both organic "light-harvesting" materials and inorganic "nanocrystalline" (high surface area) materials can provide sufficient conversion efficiencies and current densities to make practical applications feasible (Grtzel).

This is a relatively new realization in photovoltaic research and it is anticipated that improvements in these unique "hybrid" (organic/inorganic) materials, along with ongoing developments in nanostructured materials, will provide exciting advances for wearable solar cell devices.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Materials Nanotechnology
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Nanotechnology, the understanding and manipulation of matter at the nanometer scale, offers opportunities to create materials with new or significantly improved properties, relative to known materials. Examples include the numerous reports of small amounts of nanoparticle additives (such as montmorillonite clays or carbon nanotubes) giving rise to mechanical or electrical properties in polymer composites that typically require much higher loadings of conventional additives to achieve. In some cases, properties are observed in materials with controlled nanometer-scale structures that have not been realized in more conventional material structures. One example is the extraordinary diffusion barrier properties of some nanoclay-filled polymers.

Periodic structures with nano-scale features are known to interact strongly with electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths on the order of the feature size. These effects can be used to create new types of resonant structures for enhanced optical performance, for instance the photonic crystal behavior exhibited by materials with controlled structural features on the nanometer scale. Plasmonic field enhancement can also be achieved with resonant nanostructures. Nanoscale periodic structures are also used to create non-conventional optical components such as filters, polarizers and waveplates that can be tuned to operate in specific wavelength regions.

There is a need for research and development of materials incorporating nanometer-size architectures, and demonstrating enhanced or novel properties relative to existing materials in the area of physical properties, including mechanical properties, thermal properties, diffusion barrier properties, plasmonics, nanoelectronics, electromagnetic and optical properties, novel or enhanced chemical functionality and unanticipated combinations of properties. Composites of polymers with nanometer-scale reinforcements of various forms may offer enhanced mechanical properties allowing equipment to be fabricated with less weight and bulk than current designs and possibly at lower cost.

The creation of interpenetrating networks of various compositions, with domain sizes on the nanometer scale, may offer access to unprecedented material properties. Fiber or textiles with controlled nanometer-scale architectures may have application to the development of high strength, high durability or multifunctional textiles. Particular areas of application for the materials of interest include personnel armor, clothing, airdrop systems, shelters and load carriage systems, packaging materials, textile-integrated electronic systems, chemical and biological reactive materials, permselective materials, tactical optics, and vision systems.

In addition to the discovery and development of new materials, research efforts may be needed to understand the nano-scale origins of bulk properties observed in nanocomposite or nanostructured materials that could aid in the design optimization of material structures for particular applications. New techniques that will enable the creation of periodic and a-periodic structures with decreased feature size are of interest and the ability to control the geometry of nano-scale elements and their periodic configuration is also of interest. Research to develop economically viable processes for the creation of nano-structured materials on a commercial scale may be of interest.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Modular Personal Protection Equipment (MPPE) and Injury Diagnostic/Assessment Tools
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Personnel protection for the individual combatant involves protection of the torso (to include the extremities, arms, groin and legs) against fragmentation munitions, blast effects, small arms and handgun projectiles. New materials, designs and technologies are required to meet these broad range of threats while also providing the appropriate ergonomics, comfort, weight and cooling necessary for the individual to be capable of wearing the body armor for extended periods of time.

Torso/extremity protection for the individual combatant involves protection against fragmentation munitions, handgun projectiles, blunt trauma impact, and behind armor effects including injuries caused by kinetic energy and blast waves. New materials, designs including modeling and simulation design tools, survivability models, treatments and diagnosis technologies are required to meet this broad range of threats while also providing in-depth consideration to the appropriate ergonomics, comfort, maneuverability, mission requirements, thermal/vapor management and other cognitive functions necessary for the combatant to fully execute his/her operational duties without extensive physical impairments.

The goal of this task is to develop a modular personnel protective system and modeling tools which can be tailored to defeat specific threats including fragmentation/blast munitions, handgun and small arms projectiles. The modular system will have the capability to achieve various levels of personnel protection to meet specific threats and missions and to provide protection to specific and critical areas of the Soldier. The modular system will be designed to protect areas of the body not currently protected by the Improved Outer Tactical Vest (IOTV) and Enhanced Small Arms Protective Plates (ESAPI). In order to support this requirement new diagnostic and assessment methods and tools for behind armor and penetrating wounds are required.

A comparison of current capabilities versus future battlefield requirements dictates interest in the following major areas of scientific knowledge and technological capabilities. Technology is needed for the following:

  1. New and improved polymers for fiber reinforced plastics and resins which can provide increased ballistic protection and lighter weight
  2. New fibers and materials for energy absorption and moisture vapor permeability/cooling management
  3. Improved ceramic materials and designs capable of providing weight reductions, improved frangibility, and body conforming shapes
  4. Improved lightweight integrated and flexible extremity protection
  5. Engineering designs which incorporate enhancements to personnel protection including area of coverage (soft and hard armors), modular attachment points, flexibility, compatibility with existing equipment and tailorability to increasing threat levels

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Advanced Technologies - Small Unmanned System Technology
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology has had a dramatic impact on the battlefield in recent years, permitting commanders and individual Warfighters to understand and develop a situation before making contact, maneuver largely out of contact, and only then, initiate decisive action, bringing all inherent capabilities to bear with accuracy and lethality. The ability to collect and disseminate real-time battlespace information is a critical need. Uncertainty about hostile and friendly conditions on the battlefield dictates cautious movement and a requirement for response options to any number of contingencies, with resulting expenditure of time and resources. This is often followed by initiation of action at times and places not of the commander's choosing.

Likewise, the technological advances of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Systems (UGVS) have matured significantly during the Global War on Terror. As UGVS technical maturity has risen, so has acceptance of these technologies by the Warfighter. Effort is underway to develop and integrate technologies addressing the following:

  1. A more efficient and effective use of available bandwidth appropriate to a 2-10 pound Small Unmanned Aerial System (SUAS) or man portable UGVS
  2. A greatly improved ability to detect and identify potential battlefield threats
  3. The ability to engage those threats with organic and precision indirect fires
  4. The ability to conduct SUAS and/or UGVS missions with higher reliability, minimized size/weight, and/or maximized range/endurance
  5. The tools to train effectively, maintain proficiency, and evolve tactics, techniques and procedures

Concept papers and proposals are requested in the following areas and are not necessarily limited to the specific areas of interest indicated:

  1. Payloads for integration: imaging, image processing, acoustic, targeting, chemical, etc.
  2. Targeting: image processing, differential GPS, etc.
  3. Command, control and communications (C3): digital links, communications networks/protocols, relays, encryption, non-line of sight reliability, etc.
  4. Platform technology: miniaturized avionics, improved propulsion, pocket sized platforms, improved power sources, fuel engines, improved soldier portability, etc.
  5. Simulation and training: battlespace simulation, hardware in-the-loop trainer, etc.

Additionally, technology candidates must exhibit the following characteristics:

  1. Technical Readiness Level of 5-7
  2. Stand-alone system requiring no large residuals such as HMMWVs or other vehicle/infrastructure for support
  3. Minimized weight, volume, manpower requirements, and power consumption for either subcomponents suitable for integration into existing platforms or newly proposed systems/platforms

The development timeframe for this effort is January 2007 through September 2010.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline:  Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Soldier-Borne Power Sources
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

In the future, dismounted soldiers capabilities will continually be modernized with advanced sensors, networking and processing technologies all of which require man portable power sources. While many of these technologies will possess advanced low power electronics and power management features the need for innovative power source solutions for the small combat unit will remain an essential aspect of the Army's soldier modernization program. Emerging operational concepts dictate the need for technology to support extended missions without the benefit of re-supply for 72 hours or longer.

Power source solutions that can demonstrate through objective analysis substantial reductions in life cycle cost and logistics burden are of primary interest to the Army. Technologies and concepts that provide improvements in energy density, ergonomics, "ease of use" and safety to facilitate human factors and soldier-centric integration will also be given special attention. An example of a specific area of interest is solid oxide fuel cell on a silicon chip (MEMS SOFC). Power levels of 20 to 30 watts are the range of interest. The complete SOFC system, including fuel, must be less than 0.8 liter and no more than 0.6 kg.

Research proposals are sought to develop demonstration prototype products that meet the above criteria.

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Warfighter Systems Technologies - Warrior Performance
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Army
U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC)
Natick Contracting Division
Broad Agency Announcement (07-09 Natick BAA)

Warrior Performance is the degree to which a Warfighter's skills and abilities are implemented for a particular task or set of tasks. It is specific to the military operational environment. There are on-going efforts to generate data in the area of human factors as it relates to Warrior Performance, however, most of these efforts relate to the physical aspects of performance. Though significant work is being done through these efforts more work remains in order to gain a complete picture of the relationship of the warrior to his/her environment.

Concentration on the cognitive aspects of individual warrior performance is lagging. Significant work still remains to be done in this area as well. The objective of this area of study is to generate methodologies as well as relevant data that can be applied directly to the development of emerging warrior systems with equal emphasis on physical and cognitive performance and can be utilized by emerging behavioral models for the same purpose. The warrior performance target audience includes male and female Dismounted Infantry, Mounted Infantry, Engineers, SOF, Medics, Army Aircrew and Military Police.

The scientific and technical areas of interest are as follows (development and validation of quantitative measures and criteria as well as methodologies for evaluating these areas is a key element of any proposed effort):

  1. Research to determine the performance of individuals and small units with respect to their Situation Awareness - influencing factors for investigation should include, but not be limited to, maturity, skill, experience, motivation, risk acceptance, training and learned versus inherent propensity for situation awareness; studies may also include the impact of mission (e.g., complexity, type, intensity), mission environment (e.g., MOUT, Jungle) training proficiency and unit dispersion on the SA of individuals and small units; studies on the impact of different technology types on situation awareness, and situation awareness and the 'small unit dynamic' are also of interest
  2. Studies on the effect of fatigue on warriors to include, but not be limited to, the influence of mission on physical and cognitive fatigue, quantification of the physical/cognitive relationship of fatigue, quantification of different types of fatigue (e.g., muscle, cognitive, systemic) and their impact on warrior performance, determining mitigating factors of fatigue related to training and determining whether levels/degrees of fatigue be can predicted based on personal characteristics
  3. Research to determine differences in warrior performance due to varying missions (e.g., attack, raid, SASO) and mission environments (e.g., Desert, Arctic); this research should highlight the impact on physical and cognitive warrior performance
  4. Taxonomy - Develop taxonomy of measures and associated criteria of physical and cognitive warrior performance

For more information: https://www3.natick.army.mil/ssbaa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. This BAA shall remain in effect until March 31, 2011, unless superseded, extended or canceled. Concept papers will be accepted up until the close of business on February 28, 2011. Proposals may be submitted at any time after the concept paper has been approved and up until the BAA closing date of March 31, 2011. Awards against this BAA may be made up until June 30, 2011.

Window on the World (WOW) Program - AFOSR-BAA-2009-01
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Air Force (USAF)
Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
Broad Agency Announcement (BAA)
Education and Outreach Programs

The Window on Europe, Window on Asia, and Window on Canada, Central, and South America programs provide outstanding Air Force scientists and engineers the opportunity to conduct full-time research at a foreign host laboratory or full-time science and technology assessment activities. Proposals that focus tightly on specific research problems or specific science and technology assessment topics will merit greater consideration than those that are of a survey nature.

For more information: http://www.wpafb.af.mil/AFRL/afosr/

Deadline: Continuous. This announcement remains open until superseded. Proposals are reviewed and evaluated as they are received. Proposals may be submitted at any time during the year.

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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Institute of International Public Policy - 84.269A
United States Department of Education (ED)
Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE)

The purpose of the program is to provide a grant that establishes an Institute for International Public Policy that will conduct a program to enhance the international competitiveness of the United States by increasing the participation of underrepresented populations in the international service, including private international voluntary organizations and the foreign service of the United States.

The program shall include a program for students to study abroad in their junior year, fellowships for graduate study, internships, and intensive academic programs, such as summer institutes, or intensive language training. Under this competition the department is particularly interested in applications that address the following priority. This priority is projects that focus on any of the 78 priority languages selected from the U.S. Department of Education's list of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs).

For more information: http://www.ed.gov/programs/iegpsiipp/index.html

Deadline: May 01, 2009

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Mathematics for Analysis of Petascale Data
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Science
Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

The analysis of large-scale datasets has become increasingly difficult due to the complexity and enormous volume of data obtained from observatories, experimental facilities, and computational simulations. DOE scientists need to address the daunting challenges in extracting scientific knowledge from petascale data, and mathematical methods have long been the mainstay for such efforts. Over the next decade, many existing approaches for data analysis will fail to provide adequate robustness, scalability, and combinatorial tractability. The Applied Mathematics Program within the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research supports basic research on the mathematical methods and numerical algorithms that address these long-term needs.

This announcement solicits innovative basic research applications in mathematics for petascale data analysis. Particularly innovative approaches for supporting mathematical research efforts, including but not limited to workshops and conferences, will also be considered under this solicitation. This announcement seeks applications for basic research in mathematical models, methods and tools for the representation, analysis, and understanding of petascale data.

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to

  • novel mathematical techniques and algorithmic approaches to build and evaluate appropriate models from large-scale, heterogeneous, high-dimensional data;
  • new algorithms designed to scale with the size of the data, which is often independent of the number of model parameters, and so may require parallel, single-pass, or subsampling methodologies;
  • methodologies for analyzing data, distributed over space and time, with changing local properties that may not statistically resemble the global properties of the data;
  • the development of real-time anomaly identification in streaming and evolving data for detecting and responding to interesting phenomena that may be short-lived or urgent;
  • novel mathematical approaches to improve the methods of collection for petascale data, and dimension reduction for extracting pertinent subsets, features of interest, or low-dimensional patterns;
  • the development of rigorous mathematical approaches for combining data of different types and quality (e.g., noisy or incomplete data), and that can also quantify the various forms of uncertainties in the data; and
  • rigorous mathematical methods for identifying important features in complex data, such as time-dependent scalar, vector, and tensor field data.

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46434

Deadline: A one-page Letter of Intent (LOI) to submit an application is required and must be received by April 15, 2009, 4:30 P.M. Eastern Time. A response to the Letters of Intent encouraging or discouraging formal applications will be communicated to the applicants by April 24, 2009. Formal applications will be accepted only from those encouraged to submit. No other formal applications will be considered. The application due date is May 29, 2009, 8:00 P.M. Eastern Time.

Radiochemistry and Instrumentation Research
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Science
Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the Office of Science (SC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances world-class biological and environmental research programs and scientific facilities for DOE missions in energy, environment, and basic research. BER hereby announces its interest in receiving applications for pilot research project grants in two topic areas, Radiochemistry and Radionuclide Imaging Instrumentation.

In the area of Radiochemistry, BER invites applications for fundamental research involving particularly improvements in the synthetic methodology for incorporating the radioisotope in a wide range of organic molecules with techniques designed to allow dual or multiple labeling of the targeting molecule for dual energy or hybrid imaging techniques in vivo. In the area of Radionuclide Imaging Instrumentation, BER invites applications dealing with the design and development of new or improved radionuclide imaging instrumentation that can significantly increase the accuracy of quantitative assessments of the three dimensional spatial and temporal distribution of radiotracers in living systems with the aid of hybrid imaging techniques.

Applications should focus on basic research that will significantly advance the current state of the science underpinning nuclear medicine research and applications. Responses to this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) should address the development and use of highly innovative radiotracer chemistry or instrumentation technologies for quantitative in vivo measurement of site-specific (in situ) chemical reactions, their spatial distributions and metabolic perturbations, and ensuing biological processes with a high degree of accuracy.

This FOA is to solicit applications for grants in the radiochemistry topic area to support development of new techniques for dual labeling of molecular probes (including nanoparticles) of biological importance, both with radionuclides in high specific activities and with contrast agents for CT, MRI, or a variety of indicators for optical imaging. These new labeling techniques can be applicable to molecular probes for either PET or SPECT imaging.

The two different molecular labels may include also two different radionuclides with or without additional labels for CT, MRI or Optical Imaging at different sites of the same molecular probe in order to reflect two different functional characteristics or a combination of structural and functional information through the use of multimodality/hybrid instruments such as PET/MRI, PET/CT or PET combined with an Optical detector system.

In addition, this FOA solicits applications for grants to support development of new advanced hybrid instruments which can provide accurate spatial localization and quantitative measurement of metabolic and biochemical processes in one milimeter cubed target volumes throughout the entire field of view and have sensitivities the same or significantly higher than currently available high-resolution MicroPET or MicroSPECT systems.

Within the context of the current mission, scope and focus of BER, the programmatic goal of this FOA is to provide, through basic research, the Radiochemistry and Instrumentation capabilities for quantitative measurement, detection and study of in situ perturbations of homeostatic reactions and biological processes underlying the functional differentiation of organs, tissues and specialized cell types. It is anticipated that new radiotracer and new imaging instrumentation technologies will provide invaluable tools to investigators for advancing the biological applications of nuclear medicine.

Applications should address hypothesis-driven research to define and/or understand the key physical, chemical, and biological problems influencing the need for the proposed technological advances. Furthermore, these applications should discuss and detail the scientific basis for the development of new, innovative radiochemistry or imaging instrumentation technologies. Applications should address the applicability of the proposed research to DOE's stated investments in science and technology and describe how the proposed research will contribute to the advancement of nuclear medicine.

For more information: http://www.sc.doe.gov/grants/FAPN09-18.html

Deadline: April 20, 2009

Deadline note: Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to submit a brief preapplication for receipt by DOE by 4:30 P.M., Eastern Time, April 20, 2009. A response to the preapplications encouraging or discouraging formal applications will be communicated to the applicants by April 24, 2009. The application due date is May 20, 2009, 8:00 P.M., Eastern Time.

Nuclear Energy University Programs - Fellowship and Scholarship Support
Fundamental Developments in Sensors and Controls for Power and Fuel Systems
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Idaho Operations Office

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to award five-year cooperative agreements (which may run up to eight years) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fellowship and Scholarship Awards. Universities that are awarded cooperative agreements will be pre-qualified to provide NE fellowships and scholarships to selected students. These fellowships and scholarships will be awarded through a separate mechanism. Fellowship and scholarship funding will be distributed through this cooperative agreement to the universities where selected students will be attending. The fellowships and scholarships are specifically focused on nuclear science and engineering disciplines.

The mission of the NE is to lead the DOE investment in the development and exploration of advanced nuclear science and technology. NE promotes nuclear power as a resource capable of meeting the nation's energy, environmental and national security needs by resolving technical and regulatory barriers through research, development and demonstration. NE University Program goals and objectives are to

  • assist in addressing nuclear energy technical R&D challenges;
  • maintain the nation's leading position in nuclear energy R&D;
  • advance the state of U.S. nuclear technology; and
  • improve the nation's nuclear science and engineering (NS&E) infrastructure so the industry will be ready for future expansion.

NE fellowships and scholarships awards will attract high-quality undergraduate and graduate students into nuclear science and engineering at universities. This is consistent with the objectives outlined in the 2007 America Competes Act aimed at enhancing science and engineering disciplines at the nation's universities. Educating undergraduate and graduate students in the NS&E field will

- enhance a university's or college's ability to conduct research and development;
- fulfill national demand for highly trained scientists and engineers to work in NS&E areas in which DOE has ongoing research and development; and
- support the ongoing need for personnel who can develop and maintain the nation's nuclear power technology.

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=nLFvJWfTzRcWGVYpJLR6ybkpVw5wKK4yvmHtJLyQK1hJcPNHQdGw
!1092905380?oppId=46588&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW

Deadline: May 04, 2009

Deadline note: Applications should be received by May 4, 2009, not later than 8:00 P.M. Eastern Time. Applicants are encouraged to transmit their application well before the deadline. Applicants are requested to submit a letter of intent within one week from date of issuance of this Funding Opportunity Announcement. Letters of intent need only provide the name of the school and a short description of the eligible program(s) with major or minor degree of study in nuclear science, nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, health physics, and nuclear chemistry. Letters of intent will be used by DOE to organize and expedite the merit review process. Failure to submit such letters will not negatively affect a responsive application submitted in a timely fashion.

Fundamental Developments in Sensors and Controls for Power and Fuel Systems
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking innovative research and development of sensor and control systems to support the full-scale implementation and operation of highly efficient, near zero emission power generation technologies. These technologies include advanced combustion, gasification, turbines, fuel cells, gas cleaning and separation technologies, and carbon capture. Technology development is also in place for the concurrent production of synthetic fuels from coal and other domestic resources. Future power generation facilities and plants are expected to be highly efficient and complex, requiring a high level of system integration for efficient operation.

To manage complexity and achieve performance goals, advances in the capability and architecture of instrumentation, sensors, and process controls are vital in assuring highly efficient unit operations, predictive online maintenance, and continuous life cycle monitoring, which ensure further reduction in emissions. Innovations in these areas are being supported by NETL's Advanced Research Program which aims at bridging the gap between the basic sciences and applied research as it relates to Fossil Energy applications.

Long range transitional type research is needed to support the identification and growth of novel concepts leading to the potential for scientific breakthrough as well as the early adoption of innovative concepts into applications for power generation. With the goals of enabling, improving, and protecting power systems through the application of advanced sensors and controls, the areas for long range transitional research are outlined as follows. Applications are sought in the following areas with specific focus on novel and innovative concepts and the application to Fossil Energy Power Generation and Fuel Production Technologies:

  1. Advanced Materials Development for High Temperature Sensing
  2. Novel Sensor Constructs for Harsh Environments
  3. Modeling the Placement and Performance of Sensors
  4. Multizonal Reduced Order Model Development for Gasification and Combustion Reactors

For more information: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46545

Deadline: May 12, 2009

Deadline note: Applications must be received by May 12, 2009, not later than 11:59 P.M. Eastern Time. Applicants are encouraged to transmit their application well before the deadline.

Applications for Beam Time: Advanced Photon Source (APS)
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) makes beam time available through the General User Program (GUP). Proposals from general users are submitted, reviewed, and allocated time through a web-based application. The proposal submission, review, and allocation cycle occurs three times a year, prior to each APS run cycle. Proposals are peer-reviewed and rated, and beam time is allocated on the basis of these reviews by one of two Beam Time Allocation Committees. Once time has been allocated, the beamline staff schedule the proposals.

The Advanced Photon Source is a synchrotron light source that produces high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray beams. The source is optimized to put large quantities of high-energy photons into a very small area in a very short time. The x-ray beam is customized at each beamline to meet particular needs. With more than 40 beamlines already operational, and more under development, the APS offers an exceptionally broad range of experimental conditions at a single facility. It is located at Argonne National Laboratory, 30 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois, with two nearby airports offering many travel options.

Scientists from around the world come to the APS to conduct forefront basic and applied research in the fields of materials science; biological science; physics; chemistry; environmental, geophysical, and planetary science; and innovative x-ray instrumentation. Each beamline at the APS offers a unique combination of capabilities, but some of the main considerations are energy range and tunability, special sample environments, time structures, and beam size.

The energies used range from relatively "soft" x-rays (3-5 keV) to "hard" x-rays at 100 keV and sometimes higher. At many beamlines, the energy can be tuned with relative ease. Samples can be examined under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, and several facilities are available for samples requiring special handling (e.g., biohazards, radioactive samples). Many experiments involve timing, through correlation with a pulsed laser or with the time structure of the x-ray pulses, for example. In the typical operating mode, the x-rays come in evenly spaced bunches or pulses, with 0.31 mA per pulse and 11.37 nanoseconds between pulses. Some beamlines employ additional optics to narrow the already tight beam into even smaller spots, offering spatial resolution into the 50-nm range.

For more information: http://www.aps.anl.gov/Users/apply_for_beamtime.html

Deadline: July 10, 2009

Deadline note: The proposal submission, review, and allocation cycle occurs three times a year (roughly in March, July, and October), prior to each APS run cycle. A rapid-access request can be submitted at any point in the run cycle. If it is not approved for immediate access, it does not "roll over" into the next cycle, the applicant must submit a regular request at the next General User deadline.

Division Postdoctoral Appointments
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Division Postdoctoral Associates typically conduct research on Argonne's existing science and technology programs. Candidates are selected based on their academic background and possible input to the research program as described in their proposal. Appointments are awarded for a one-year term, with possible renewal for up to the third year.

The sponsor, who writes the nomination memo, could be someone already familiar with the applicant's research work and accomplishments through previous collaborations or professional societies. Also, applicants can visit the detailed websites of the various Research Programs, Research Divisions, and Project Descriptions to identify a potential sponsor.

For more information: http://www.dep.anl.gov/Postdocs/divisionpostdoc.htm

Deadline: Varies. Candidates may view the list of current openings at the following URL: http://www.anl.gov/jobsearch/search.jsp?fldBrowse=POSTDOC Alternatively, applicants can identify an ANL employee (sponsor) and enquire about future postdoctoral opportunities.

Faculty Research Leave (Sabbatical) Program
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Faculty members may spend their sabbatical leave, typically 9-12 months, at the laboratory. The Faculty Research Leave Program is intended to provide mutual benefits to the faculty members and the laboratory. In addition to bringing about fruitful research activity, it provides Argonne scientists and engineers and visiting faculty opportunities to develop a strengthened rapport and to catalyze the formation of continuing research partnerships and collaborations.

Appointments are normally for an academic or a calendar year. Interactions of faculty with students in the research programs is strongly encouraged. This can take the form of research collaboration as well as more conventional interactions such as seminars and teaching. Also, when funding is available, faculty can involve qualified student(s) from their home campus in their Argonne research program.

For more information: http://www.dep.anl.gov/p_faculty/frl.htm

Deadline: Continuous. An expression of interest may be submitted at any time. Argonne desires that the expression of interest in Faculty Research Leave participation by an individual faculty member, along with university endorsement of such participation, be transmitted to the Division of Educational Programs.

Systems Biology Fellowship Program
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

The completion of the human genome sequence as well as the genome sequences of other organisms has provoked both the challenge and the technical capabilities for understanding how the numerous, genome-coded cellular constituents function, both spatially and temporally, together within the living cell. This approach, called systems biology, requires a new type of scientist, who can work in multidisciplinary teams, handle large data sets, and use both biological and computational approaches. The Systems Biology Fellowship (SBF) Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is designed to train scientists at the postdoctoral level in this new discipline.

The SBF program will provide interactive, hands-on training at the postdoctoral level in the new discipline of systems biology. Postdoctoral training will include mentored research within multidisciplinary systems biology teams, the availability of advanced technologies at PNNL, and comprehensive training opportunities to complement the fellows' previous knowledge. Based on each fellow's specific background and training needs, workshops or formal courses in areas such as bioinformatics, computational biology, or molecular biology will be provided. A seminar course will introduce fellows to new findings in the area of systems biology and provide a forum for interaction between various laboratories engaged in systems biology on the PNNL campus.

Some of the SBF research areas include mechanisms of oxidative stress response, biological aging, carcinogenesis, understanding cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, spatial regulation of signal transduction, interrogative cell signaling, the role of post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions in cell signaling, environmental sensing in microbes, and microbial communities. Fellows will be able to utilize conventional and advanced research capabilities in solving complex biological problems.

Resources and technical capabilities include mass spectrometry and proteomics, computational biology and bioinformatics, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a variety of cell imaging capabilities.

For more information: http://www.sysbio.org/resources/education/postdoc.stm

Deadline: Continuous. Applications will be reviewed on a continual basis for appointments to coordinate with the annual November start date of the program.

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Recovery Act Limited Competition: Supporting New Faculty Recruitment to Enhance Research Resources Through Biomedical Research Core Centers (P30) - Recovery Act, ARRA
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act or ARRA), Public Law 111-5, invites applications from U.S academic institutions and organizations to support the hiring of newly recruited faculty to develop research projects within the context of Biomedical Core Centers. For this announcement, a Biomedical Core Center is defined as a community of multidisciplinary researchers focusing on areas of biomedical research relevant to NIH, such as centers, departments, programs, or transdepartmental collaborations or consortia. These awards are designed to enhance innovative programs of excellence by providing scientific and programmatic support for promising research faculty and their areas of research. Specifically for the purposes of this announcement, Core Center Grants are institutional awards that provide funding to hire, provide appropriate start-up packages, and develop pilot research projects for newly independent investigators, with the goal of augmenting and expanding the institution's community of multidisciplinary researchers focusing on areas of biomedical research relevant to NIH.

Applicants should refer to the IC Table of Contacts (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/contacts/RFA-OD-09-005_contacts.htm,/a>) for information regarding each IC's grants management contacts for this program.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-005.html

Deadline: May 29, 2009

Deadline note: Although not required, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent by April 29, 2009. Applications are due by May 29, 2009. Internal coordination required. The number of applications permitted per institution or organization varies among participating NIH ICs.

Note:  This is a limited submission RFP.  For information regarding internal deadlines, please visit the VT Limited Submissions website: http://www.research.vt.edu/limitsubs/index.html Or contact Beth Tranter at etranter@vt.edu.

Community-Based Partnerships for Childhood Obesity Prevention and Control: Research to Inform Policy (R03)
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to enhance childhood obesity research by fostering the formation of local, state, or regional teams consisting of researchers, policymakers, and other relevant stakeholders (e.g., community representatives, public health practitioners or officials, educators) in order to identify research questions and hypotheses, design and implement the relevant research, and translate the research into evidence relevant to potential policy efforts in this area. The R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. The R03 is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-140.html

Deadline: June 16, 2009, October 16, 2009, February 16, 2010

Coordinating Center for Organ Transplant Clinical Trials (U01)
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

NIAID invites applications from institutions for renewal of a Statistical and Clinical Coordinating Center (SACCC) to support clinical studies in organ transplantation conducted by the following NIAID-sponsored clinical consortia: the Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT) Consortium, the Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation in Children (CTOT-C) Consortium, and the Genomics of Transplantation Cooperative Research Program (GTCRP). The SACCC will provide statistical expertise, data management, and clinical site monitoring, and will work with NIAID staff to ensure that studies are conducted in compliance with Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and the federal regulations governing human subjects research.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-09-015.html

Deadline: July 21, 2009

Deadline note: Although not required, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent by June 22, 2009. Applications are due by July 21, 2009.

Partnerships for Development of Vaccines for Selected Pathogens (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites research applications for projects that will advance development of vaccines against five pathogens that have a significant impact on public health: cytomegalovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Clostridium difficile. The formation of collaborative partnerships between academic (or nonprofit) researchers from different disciplines or with industry is strongly encouraged, but not required.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-09-016.html

Deadline: July 27, 2009

Deadline note: Although not required, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent by June 26, 2009. Applications are due by July 27, 2009.

Development of PET and SPECT Ligands for Brain Imaging (SBIR [R43/R44])
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is intended to stimulate the commercial development of novel radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in the human brain, and to incorporate pilot or clinical feasibility evaluation in pre-clinical studies, model development, or clinical studies.

The NIH institutes listed in this FOA are specifically interested in the development of radioligands for molecular targets (e.g., receptors, cell adhesion molecules, intracellular messengers, and disease related proteins) that are of broad interest to the scientific community. These radiotracers will be used for neuroimaging as well as potential biological markers and surrogate endpoints for translational and clinical research, drug discovery and development, and clinical trials. Also appropriate for this FOA are applications proposing research and development of new technologies for radiotracer development.

Exploratory studies on the identification of novel targets or the identification of base compounds for specific molecular targets are not appropriate topics for this initiative.

Molecular targets for which radioligands are needed, and for which research and development is encouraged under this FOA include, but are not limited to, those listed below:

  1. Receptors: adenosine; adrenergic: alpha 1, alpha 2; cannabinoid: CB1, CB2; corticotropin releasing hormone: CRH R1, CRH R2; dopamine: D1, D3, D4, D5, and low affinity DA receptors; estrogen; GABA A subunits; GABA ion channel; GABA B; glutaminergic; glycine site; metabotropic glutamate subtypes; muscarinic subunits; neurokinin receptors: NK1, NK2, NK3; nicotinic receptor subunits: alpha 7 and alpha 4 beta 2; NMDA subunits; opioid receptors: mu, delta, kappa; serotonin: 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT6, 5-HT7; sigma ligand; substance P; voltage gated ion channels: Ca, Na, K - M current proteins
  2. Transporters: vesicular ACh; GABA glutamate; NET; SERT
  3. Enzymes: choline acetyltransferase; dopamine beta-hydroxylase; GABA transaminase; glutamic acid decarboxylase; glutaminergic; phosphodiesterases; tyrosine hydroxylase
  4. Intracellular targets: amyloid deposition; diacylglycerol; gene expression markers; lipid metabolism; neuroinflammatory markers: cytokines, COX inhibitors; synthases; peptidases; phosphatases; phospholipases; protein kinases; stem cells
  5. Development of selective hormone receptor radioligands (e.g., for estrogen receptor ß, corticosteroid hormone receptors, and thyroid receptors) for basic research including novel tools and approaches to visualize activation of steroid hormone receptors in brain imaging studies across the lifespan

The following objectives would make appropriate topics for proposed Phase I/Phase II projects. This list is not meant to be all-inclusive:

  1. Lead compound identification/development and syntheses of chemicals with suitable binding affinity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and physio-chemical properties allowing radiochemical synthesis
  2. Preclinical studies, including initial pharmacology and toxicology to screen out compounds that are unlikely to be promising candidates for PET or SPECT imaging; radiolabeling procedures; in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography; in vivo imaging including micro PET (rodent or primate); and studies of pharmacological specificity, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics
  3. Model development for quantitation, including development and evaluation of pharmacokinetic models and use of animal models of gradient of binding sites/enzymes to assess sensitivity to changes
  4. Determination of toxicology/pathology (Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approvable) for submission of and Radioactive Drug Research Committee (RDRC) or Investigational New Drug (IND) application
  5. IND application development and submission to the FDA prior to pilot human studies
  6. Pilot human imaging studies with normal controls, pharmacological challenges with analyses of radiometabolites under the auspices of IRB approval (i.e., RDRC or IND development and submission)
  7. Clinical studies in patient/disease population or experimental manipulations

Participating organizations include the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), and National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

For more information: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-137.html

Deadline: August 05, 2009, December 05, 2009, April 05, 2010

Deadline note: This opportunity will expire on May 8, 2011. Applicants may submit more than one application, provided that each application is scientifically distinct. Applicants may not simultaneously submit identical or essentially identical applications under both this SBIR funding opportunity and any other HHS FOA, including the current SBIR and STTR Parent FOAs. The NIH will accept as many "different" applications as the applicant organization chooses. However, the NIH will not accept similar grant applications with essentially the same research focus from the same applicant organization.

Amount note: This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications. Phase I awards normally may not exceed $100,000 total for a period normally not to exceed six months. Phase II awards normally may not exceed $750,000 total for a period normally not to exceed two years. For this funding opportunity, budgets up to $300,000 total costs per year and time periods up to two years for Phase I may be requested. Budgets up to $500,000 total costs per year and up to three years may be requested for Phase II. Only one Phase II award may be made for a single SBIR/STTR project. This program does not require cost sharing.

Novel Tools for Investigating Brain-derived GPCRs in Mental Health Research (STTR [R41/R42])
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

The purpose of this program is to encourage small businesses to develop technologies and approaches (i.e., novel ways to use new or existing technologies) that will enable researchers to better study the structure and/or function of brain localized G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) and/or potentially identify novel selective and specific agonists/antagonists to these receptor subtypes, with a focus on mental health function or dysfunction.

Technologies and approaches aimed at either known receptor subtypes or orphan receptors would be of potential interest to NIMH. Examples of novel technologies and approaches needed to further elucidate the function of GPCRs and/or identify selective agonists/antagonists may include one or more of the following: computational models, high throughput molecular or cell-based assays, behavioral models, molecular imaging techniques, novel crystallization strategies, novel technologies and/or approaches to increase the yield of GPCR protein, etc.

Examples of specific tool applications include the following: definition of structural relationships of GPCRs with small molecules, identification of orphan GPCRs with mental health relevance, cell signaling measures, receptor purification, crystallization and/or 3-D structure identification, etc.

Examples of mental health disorders include the following: schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, Tourette's syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism spectrum disorders, AIDS dementia complex, etc.

For more information:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-374.html

Deadline: August 05, 2009, December 05, 2009

Amount note: This funding opportunity will use the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR [R41/R42]) grant mechanisms. For this funding opportunity, budgets up to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to two years for Phase I may be requested. Budgets up to $450,000 total costs per year and up to three years may be requested for Phase II. Cost sharing is not required.

Novel Tools for Investigating Brain-derived GPCRs in Mental Health Research (SBIR [R43/R44])
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

The purpose of this program is to encourage small businesses to develop technologies and approaches (i.e., novel ways to use new or existing technologies) that will enable researchers to better study the structure and/or function of brain localized G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) and/or potentially identify novel selective and specific agonists/antagonists to these receptor subtypes, with a focus on mental health function or dysfunction.

Technologies and approaches aimed at either known receptor subtypes or orphan receptors would be of potential interest to NIMH. Examples of novel technologies and approaches needed to further elucidate the function of GPCRs or identify selective agonists/antagonists may include one or more of the following: computational models, high throughput molecular or cell-based assays, behavioral models, molecular imaging techniques, novel crystallization strategies, novel technologies or approaches to increase the yield of GPCR protein, etc.

Examples of specific tool applications include the following: definition of structural relationships of GPCRs with small molecules, identification of orphan GPCRs with mental health relevance, cell signaling measures, receptor purification, crystallization and/or 3-D structure identification, etc.

Examples of mental health disorders include the following: schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, Tourette's syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism spectrum disorders, AIDS dementia complex, etc.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-375.html

Deadline: August 05, 2009, December 05, 2009

Amount note: This funding opportunity will use the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR [R43/R44]) grant mechanisms. For this funding opportunity, budgets up to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to two years for Phase I may be requested. Budgets up to $450,000 total costs per year and up to three years may be requested for Phase II. Cost sharing is not required.

Small Business Innovation Research Competing Renewal Awards for Biomedical and Behavior Research Tools (SBIR [R44])
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to continue the process of developing complex instrumentation, clinical research tools, or behavioral interventions and treatments. This FOA specifically encourages applications for the competing renewal of previously funded Phase II SBIR grants to further develop the aforementioned types of technologies.

Until now, competing renewal awards for Phase II SBIR grants have been encouraged for technologies that would ultimately require federal regulatory approval (e.g., drug development). There are, however, important technologies that would not be subject to such regulation, but that still require extraordinary time and effort to develop.

Technologies solicited by this FOA fall into three broad categories:

  1. Complex instrumentation
  2. Clinical research tools
  3. Behavioral interventions/treatments

Participating organizations include the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), and National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).

For more information: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-115.html

Deadline: August 05, 2009, December 05, 2009, April 05, 2010

Novel Statistical Methods for Human Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) Analysis (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits applications to develop innovative statistical methods to detect the influence of genetic variation on tissue-specific gene expression and regulation. The goal of the FOA is to seek proposals to develop statistical methods to appropriately analyze the forthcoming complex data sets generated by the NIH Roadmap initiative titled "Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project." Applicants are encouraged to take advantage of existing tissue-specific gene expression datasets or simulated datasets, but will also be strongly encouraged to utilize GTEx-generated data, if and when it is available.

For more information: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-09-006.html

Deadline: September 16, 2009

Deadline note: Although not required, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent by August 16, 2009. Applications are due by September 16, 2009.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

2010 Multistate Conservation Grant Program (MSCGP) Announcement of Opportunity
United States Department of the Interior (DOI)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)

The Multistate Conservation Grant Program (MSCGP) is intended to address regional or national level priorities of state fish and wildlife agencies. Up to $6,000,000 is available each calendar year to fund Multistate Conservation Grants. The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (Association) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) cooperatively administer the Multistate Conservation Grant Program. The Association solicits Letters of Intent and invites Full Proposals from eligible applicants and recommends to the USFWS a "priority list" of projects to be funded. The USFWS selects projects from the "priority list" and awards and manages grants.

Grant proposals submitted for funding must address a National Conservation Need. National Conservation Needs (NCNs) are annually solicited and selected by the Association to establish the states fish and wildlife agencies' conservation priorities, and they are used to guide proposal development and grant selection for the upcoming cycle of the Multistate Conservation Grant Program. NCNs are generally continuous, pressing resource management problems; or recently identified problems that are significant, urgent, can be met by a practical and economically feasible management approach, and will result in improved resource management or environmental quality.

  • Subject 1 Integration of fish and wildlife needs as the conservation provisions of the 2008 Farm Bill are implemented
  • Subject 2: Outdoor heritage - participation, recruitment, and retention in hunting, fishing, and conservation related recreational activities
  • Subject 3: Regional Climate Change Workshops for State Fish & Wildlife Managers on current information and tools for management of fish and wildlife
  • Subject 4: State Fish and Wildlife Agency Coordination and Administration
  • Subject 5: A National Fish and Wildlife Health Initiative
  • Subject 6: Formation and Operations of Fish Habitat Partnerships to Facilitate National Fish Habitat Action Plan Implementation
  • Subject 7: Protect State Wildlife Agencies' Authority to Sustainably Manage Wildlife Resources in Concert with Federal Actions

Required by International Treaties and Conventions

A proposed project is only eligible for a grant if the project will benefit

  • at least 26 states;
  • a majority of the states in a region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; or
  • a regional association of state fish and wildlife agencies.

For more information: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46419

Deadline:  May 6, 2009

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Broad Agency Announcement for Innovative Small Research Projects to Advance Public Participation Related to Public Transportation Planning
United States Department of Transportation (DOT)
Federal Transit Administration (FTA)

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) is soliciting proposals for applied research in the area of public participation as it relates to the planning of public transportation projects and programs. The purpose of the Public Transportation Participation (PTP) Program, as called for under Section 3046 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), is to support the research and development of innovative approaches to enhance the quality and level of public participation in public transportation planning.

For more information: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&flag2006=false&oppId=46140

Deadline: May 8, 2009

Amount note: FTA has budgeted approximately $750,000 for conducting research under this fourth phase of the PTP Program. Funding for future years of the Program will be based on availability of funds. In keeping with that concept, FTA anticipates awarding 6-10 proposals for work to be completed within 12-18 months of receipt of the funding award. FTA also may choose to fund only a part of a proposed project. FTA will consider projects of longer duration, but the work activities and product delivery must be phased in such a way as to produce a viable first-phase product. After the first phase of a project, funding for subsequent phases will be contingent on availability of funds and satisfactory progress against planned work to that point. FTA also reserves the right to not fund proposed projects. FTA also may withdraw its obligation to provide Federal assistance if the recipient does not submit the formal application (to be completed after selection) within 90 days following the date of the offer.

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Joint U.S. - UK Research Program: Environmental Behavior, Bioavailability and Effects of Manufactured Nanomaterials
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Office of Research and Development (ORD)
National Center for Environmental Research (NCER)
Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Program Grants

A high-priority research area identified by the U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the UK Government Nanotechnology Research Co-ordination Group (NRCG) is to better understand the environmental risks posed by manufactured nanomaterials. The U.S. EPA, through the ORD's National Center for Environmental Research (NCER), currently supports a number of research grants that address the environmental fate, behavior and effects of manufactured nanomaterials. Similarly, the UK supports grants in this area within its Environmental Nanoscience Initiative (ENI).

Understanding the risks posed by manufactured nanomaterials is a global challenge that is best met through international collaboration, drawing on the combined expertise of researchers in many disciplines, from material scientists and environmental chemists to ecotoxicologists and risk assessors. Through nanotechnology extramural research programs, the U.S. EPA ORD and UKENI have developed strong research communities in the U.S. and UK, respectively. Currently there is a need to bring these communities together to develop integrated and predictive models of fate, behavior, bioavailability and effects for representative classes of nanomaterials of current relevance, and to validate them through interdisciplinary research that addresses key areas of uncertainty. The outcomes of such validated models should provide fundamental understanding that underpins more confident statements regarding exposure, bioavailability, and effects and effective tools for supporting management of risk posed by nanomaterials

This AO/RFA invites joint applications from UK and U.S. scientists to meet this goal by working together within a balanced and interdisciplinary consortium that maximizes the complementary strengths in both the U.S. and UK. The purpose of this international collaborative research program is to strengthen the support for research on the potential implications of nanotechnology and engineered nanomaterials on human health and the environment. The U.S. EPA and the UKENI are particularly interested in supporting research related to

  • environmental transport and transformation of manufactured nanomaterials;
  • exposure pathways;
  • quantitative assessment of nanomaterials in biological and environmental samples; and
  • environmental and health effects of released nanomaterials.

The U.S. EPA and the UKENI are soliciting research from an interdisciplinary consortium consisting of UK and U.S. partners to meet the following objectives:

  1. Propose predictive, integrated hypothetical model(s) or tools of fate, behavior, bioavailability and effects for several important and representative nanomaterial classes over key environmental pathways using intrinsic material properties and life cycle analysis as starting points for model development
  2. Validate and refine these hypothetical model(s) through interdisciplinary research, addressing key assumptions and areas of uncertainty
  3. Use these outputs (validated and integrated models) to support confident and more certain statements of environmental exposure, bioavailability, effects and risk that underpin appropriate management responses in an evidential way (the outcomes)4. Develop effective tools and methods to detect, assess, and monitor the presence of nanomaterials in biological and environmental samples

For more information: http://epa.gov/ncer/rfa/2009/2009_uk_nano.html

Deadline: August 05, 2009

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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

Planetary Major Equipment - NNH09ZDA001N-PME
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) – 2009

This program element allows proposals for new or upgraded analytical, computational, telescopic, and other instrumentation required by investigations sponsored by the Planetary Science Research Program's science research programs as offered in this solicitation, entitled Cosmochemistry; Planetary Geology and Geophysics; Planetary Astronomy; Planetary Atmospheres; Outer Planets Research; Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research; Near Earth Object Observations; Mars Fundamental Research; Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology; and Origins of Solar Systems.

Instrumentation purchases or upgrades that may be requested through this program are to be of a substantial nature; that is, over $25,000. Types and/or classes of instruments that are considered appropriate to be proposed for this program element include solid source, light element, and noble gas mass spectrometers; scanning electron microscopes; transmission electron microscopes; secondary ion mass spectrometers; activation analysis equipment; X-ray fluorescence analyzers; molecular characterization tools; liquid or gas chromatographs; static high pressure instrumentation; telescopic instrumentation; high resolution infrared spectrometers; instrumentation for planetary atmospheres laboratory studies; and instrumentation for measurements of gas phase reaction rates, photochemical reaction rates, branching rates, and/or collision, disassociation, ionization, and/or recombination cross-sections.

For more information: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7b61DBFE69-EF29-F045-309F-33E8D97CA320%7d&path=open

Deadline: Varies. The proposals for program element Planetary Major Equipment may be submitted only in conjunction with program elements Cosmochemistry; Planetary Geology and Geophysics; Planetary Astronomy; Planetary Atmospheres; Outer Planets Research; Lunar Advanced Science and Exploration Research, Near Earth Object Observations, Mars Fundamental Research; Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology; and Origins of Solar Systems.

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NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Fellowships: Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
National Foundation for the Arts and the Humanities
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Division of Research Programs

The Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan is a joint activity of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Awards support research on modern Japanese society and political economy, Japan's international relations, and U.S.-Japan relations. The program encourages innovative research that puts these subjects in wider regional and global contexts and is comparative and contemporary in nature. Research should contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of issues of concern to Japan and the United States. Appropriate disciplines for the research include anthropology, economics, geography, history, international relations, linguistics, political science, psychology, public administration, and sociology.

The fellowships are designed for researchers with advanced language skills whose research will require use of data, sources, and documents in their original languages or whose research requires interviews onsite in direct one-on-one contact. Fellows may undertake their projects in Japan, the United States, or both, and may include work in other countries for comparative purposes.

Awards usually result in articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. As tax-supported federal agencies, JUSFC and NEH endeavor to make grant products available to the broadest possible audience. Our goal is for scholars, educators, students, and the American public to have ready and easy access to the wide range of grant products. For projects that lead to the development of Web sites, all other considerations being equal, preference is given to those that provide free access to the public.

For more information: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/fellowships-japan.html

Deadline: May 05, 2009

Amount note: Fellowships cover uninterrupted periods lasting from 6 to 12 months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month award period. Applicants should request award periods that suit their schedules and the needs of their projects. Requesting an award period shorter than 12 months will not improve an applicant's chances of receiving an award. The earliest that fellows may begin work on their project is January 1, 2010; the latest date is July 1, 2011.

Fellows must work full time on their projects during the period of their awards and may not accept teaching assignments or undertake any other major activities. NEH and JUSFC will not approve part-time fellowships under any circumstance.

Fellows are responsible for the conversion of funds to foreign currencies where necessary. All awards are made by the National Endowment for the Humanities on behalf of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. As such, all awards are governed by NEH grant policies and conditions.

Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan do not require cost sharing.

Fellowships
National Foundation for the Arts and the Humanities
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Division of Research Programs

Fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to scholars and general audiences in the humanities. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, and other scholarly tools.

For more information: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/fellowships.html

Deadline: May 05, 2009

Amount note: Fellowships cover periods lasting from six to twelve months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month tenure award period. Applicants should request award periods that suit their schedules and the needs of their projects. Requesting an award period shorter than 12 months will not improve an applicant's chances of receiving a fellowship. Recipients may begin their awards as early as January 1, 2010, and as late as July 1, 2011. The award period must be continuous, and award recipients must work full time on their projects. NEH Fellowships do not require cost sharing.

NEH/CNR Fellowships for Research on Italian Cultural Heritage
National Foundation for the Arts and the Humanities
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Division of Research Programs

NEH and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) of the government of Italy are cooperating in the support of scholarly research. NEH invites applications for humanities research focusing on Italy's cultural heritage in relation to that of the United States. Recipients will be awarded fellowships through the regular NEH Fellowships program. CNR will award fellowships to Italian scholars for research on America's cultural heritage in relation to Italy.

For more information: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/fellowships-italy.html

Deadline: May 9, 2009

Amount note: NEH anticipates awarding up to three such fellowships, as does CNR. Fellowships cover periods lasting from 6 to 12 months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month tenure award period. Applicants should request award periods that suit their schedules and the needs of their projects. Requesting an award period shorter than 12 months will not improve an applicant's chances of receiving a fellowship. Recipients may begin their awards as early as January 1, 2010, and as late as July 1, 2011. The award period must be continuous, and award recipients must work full time on their projects.

NEH Fellowships do not require cost sharing.

Preservation and Access Education and Training Grants
National Foundation for the Arts and the Humanities
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Division of Preservation and Access

The Preservation and Access Education and Training program is central to NEH's efforts to preserve and establish access to cultural heritage resources. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture collections, electronic records, and digital objects. The challenge of preserving and making accessible such large and diverse holdings is enormous and the need for knowledgeable staff is significant and ongoing. Preservation and Access Education and Training grants help the staff of cultural institutions, large and small, obtain the knowledge and skills needed to serve as effective stewards of humanities collections. Grants also support educational programs that prepare the next generation of conservators and preservation professionals, as well as projects that introduce the staff of cultural institutions to recent improvements in preservation and access practices.

Preservation and Access Education and Training grants support activities such as these:

  1. Regional preservation field services that provide a wide range of education and training (for example, through surveys, workshops, consultations, reference services, and informational materials about the care of humanities collections), especially for staff at smaller libraries, museums, archives, and other cultural organizations;
  2. Graduate programs in preservation and conservation; and
  3. Workshops that address preservation and access topics of broad significance and impact, such as
  • collections care training for staff members who are responsible for the day-to-day care and management of humanities collections;
  • preventive conservation and sustainable preservation strategies;
  • disaster preparedness, response, and recovery;
  • the preservation of and provision of access to recorded sound and moving image collections;
  • digital preservation; and
  • best practices for enhancing and integrating access to collections in libraries, archives, and museums.

For more information: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pet.html

Deadline: July 01, 2009

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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Dear Colleague Letter: Graduate Research Supplements (GRS) to Current ENG Awards to Broaden Participation
National Science Foundation (NSF)

The "Dear Colleague" letter at the following link describes opportunities for supplemental graduate research funding for current NSF ENG awards to broaden participation. Per the "Dear Colleague" letter, a request for funding of a GRS should be made by the Principal Investigator of an existing ENG award. Only one new Ph.D. student for GRS may be supported under each research grant.  GRS candidates must be United States citizens or nationals, or permanent resident aliens of the United States. The graduate students must be newly enrolled in, or planning to pursue the Ph.D. degree in engineering disciplines. Renewal for a second or third year supplement requires a report on the progress of the student toward the Ph.D. degree and availability of funds in the program.
Document Number: nsf09045

For more information: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09045/nsf09045.jsp?govDel=USNSF_25

Deadline: May 26, 2009

NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12)
National Science Foundation (NSF)

This program provides funding for graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines to bring their leading research practice and findings into K-12 learning settings. Through collaborations with other graduate fellows and faculty from STEM disciplines, teachers and students in K-12 environments, and community partners, graduate students can gain a deeper understanding of their own research and place it within a societal and global context. The GK-12 program provides an opportunity for graduate students to acquire value-added skills, such as communicating STEM subjects to technical and non-technical audiences, leadership, team building, and teaching while enriching STEM learning and instruction in K-12 settings. This unique experience will add value to the training of U.S. graduate students and will energize and prepare the students for a broad range of STEM careers in a competitive globalized marketplace. Furthermore, the GK-12 program provides institutions of higher education with an opportunity to transform the conventional graduate education by infusing and sustaining GK-12 like activities in their graduate programs.
For more information: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09549/nsf09549.htm?govDel=USNSF_25
Deadline: June 29, 2009
Note:  This is a limited submission RFP.  For information regarding internal deadlines, please visit the VT Limited Submissions website: http://www.research.vt.edu/limitsubs/index.html
Or contact Beth Tranter at etranter@vt.edu.

Improvements to Biological Research Collections (BRC) - NSF 09-548
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO)
Division of Biological Infrastructure (DBI)

The BRC program provides funds for improvements to network, secure, and organize established natural history collections for sustained, accurate, and efficient accessibility of the collection to the biological research community. The program is encouraging collaborative proposals to network collections on regional and continental scales, especially collaborations that bring large and small collections together into networks. The program also provides for enhancements to existing collections to improve collections, computerize specimen-related data, develop better methods of specimen curation and collection management through activities such as symposia and workshops. Biological collections supported include those housing natural history specimens and jointly curated collections such as preserved tissues and other physical samples, e.g., DNA libraries and digital images. Such collections provide the materials necessary for research across broad areas of biological sciences.

For more information: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09548/nsf09548.htm

Deadline: July 24, 2009

Note:  This is a limited submission RFP.  For information regarding internal deadlines, please visit the VT Limited Submissions website: http://www.research.vt.edu/limitsubs/index.html
Or contact Beth Tranter at etranter@vt.edu.

Power, Controls and Adaptive Networks (PCAN)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Directorate for Engineering (ENG)
Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems Division (ECCS)

The PCAN program invests in the design and analysis of intelligent and adaptive engineering networks, including sensing, imaging, controls, and computational technologies for a variety of application domains.

The program supports distributed control of multi-agent systems with embedded computation for sensor and adaptive networks. PCAN invests in adaptive dynamic programming, brain-like networked architectures performing real-time learning, neuromorphic engineering, telerobotics, and systems theory. PCAN places emphasis on electric power networks and grids, including generation, transmission and integration of renewable, sustainable and distributed energy systems, such as fuel cells and micro-turbines in large power networks; high power electronics and drives; and understanding of associated regulatory and economic structures. The program also places emphasis on energy scavenging and alternative energy technologies, including solar cells, ocean waves, wind, geothermal, low-head hydro, and the hydrogen economy.

In addition, the program supports innovative test beds, and laboratory and curriculum development to integrate research and education. PCAN provides additional emphasis on emerging areas, such as quantum and molecular modeling and simulation of devices and systems, alternate energy sources: generation and integration in the National Grid (InterGrid), and interdependencies of critical infrastructure in power and communications.

Areas of interest include

  • Adaptive Dynamic Programming;
  • Alternate Energy Sources;
  • Embedded, Distributed, and Adaptive Control;
  • Neuromorphic Engineering;
  • Power and Energy Systems and Networks;
  • Sensing and Imaging Networks; and
  • Telerobotics.

PCAN will provide additional emphasis on emerging areas such as

  • Quantum and Molecular Modeling and Simulation of Devices and Systems;
  • Interdependencies of Critical Infrastructure in Power and Communications;
  • Integration of Alternate Energy Sources in the National Grid (InterGrid); and
  • the Brain-Computer Interface.

For more information: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13380

Deadline: October 07, 2009, February 07, 2010, April 01, 2010

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OTHER FUNDING OPPORTUNTIES

Translational Research re: Fragile X-associated Disorders (FXD)
National Fragile X Foundation

With the specific goal of improving the lives of individuals with Fragile X (FX), the National Fragile X Foundation (NFXF) will award at least one grant plus one or more additional grants based on the availability of funds.

The NFXF supports a broad range of research endeavors that will lead to better understanding, recognition, treatment and an eventual cure of children and adults with a FXD, including fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and fragile X-associated ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI).

Translational research projects focus on bringing discoveries made about the nature, causes, and consequences of Fragile X-associated Disorders into the realm of therapeutics and interventions designed to treat the symptoms or underlying deficits of those disorders.

For more information: http://www.nfxf.org/html/request_for_application.htm

Deadline: June 1, 2009

Deadline note: Funding is for a one or two-year period. Please specify the duration of your request in both your cover letter and in your email. Senior established investigators will be eligible for awards of up to $50,000 per year. Junior investigators may receive up to $35,000 per year.

Grants Creating Pathways to Citizenship, Civil Participation and Civic Integration in a Pluralistic Society
Carnegie Corporation of New York
National Program

Grants are provided to support increasing integration of immigrants into American society through civic education and citizenship and increasing tolerance through education about immigrant cultures. This goal encompasses broadening understanding of democratic institutions and pluralism while strengthening civic education to prepare young people to live in a complex society and contribute to a vibrant democracy in the United States.

These objectives have been targeted for potential funding:

  1. Increasing integration of immigrants and disconnected populations in the United States into civil society and strengthening civic education
  2. Smoothing the pathway to citizenship-helping newcomers understand what it means to be an American

For more information: http://www.carnegie.org/sub/program/national_program.html

Deadline: Continuous. The corporation accepts requests for funding at all times of the year; there are no application deadlines.

International Peace and Security
MacArthur Foundation, John D. and Catherine T.
Program on Global Security and Sustainability

The MacArthur Foundation seeks to promote international peace and security by reducing global risks from nuclear weapons, fostering cooperation to address security challenges in the Asia-Pacific region, and strengthening independent scientific advice and commentary on international security matters. The foundation is currently reviewing its international peace and security strategy. As part of the review, the foundation is considering whether to also initiate new work on one or more global issues with a security dimension, such as the convergence of development and security challenges in states at risk or the implications of climate change for international security.

Grants are awarded in the strategy areas outlined below for policy research linked to prescriptions for action, outreach to the public and policymakers, and fellowship programs. The foundation has identified the following three strategies for promoting international peace and security:

  1. Asia Security Initiative: Fostering cooperative responses to security challenges in the Asia-Pacific region
  2. Reducing Nuclear Risks: Reducing the global risks from nuclear weapons
  3. Science, Technology and Security Policy: Strengthening independent scientific advice and commentary on international security matters

In January 2009, the MacArthur Foundation launched its Asia Security Initiative (ASI) network with its support of 27 institutions from around the world. With the foundation's support, over the next three years these institutions will build their capacity for security policy research and develop policy recommendations on the most important security challenges facing Asia-Pacific nations.

The Reducing Nuclear Risks element is currently under review.

Through its seven-year Initiative on Science, Technology and Security Policy, launched in 2003, the foundation aims to increase the pool of academic scientists, engineers and other independent (non-government) experts advising policymakers and the public on international security issues. The number of such independent specialists in the U.S., Russia and China is relatively small. By increasing their number both here and abroad, and by strengthening the centers at which they conduct research, the foundation seeks to enhance the quality of policy analysis and research and to inform national and international security policy. The initiative incorporates support for a limited number of fellowships and faculty positions at selected university-based programs worldwide.
For more information: http://www.macfound.org/site/c.lkLXJ8MQKrH/b.930987/k.DA9A/International_Grantmaking__International_Peace_and_Security__
Grantmaking_Guidelines.htm

Deadline: Continuous. Additional institutions may express their interest in participating in the Asia Security Initiative by submitting a one-to-three-page concept paper. Concept papers will be collected and reviewed twice a year. Any concept paper received by June 1 will be reviewed for possible grant consideration by the Foundation Board in September, and any concept paper received by December 15 will be reviewed for possible grant consideration by the foundation's board in March. The foundation is not accepting proposals related to the Initiative on Science, Technology and Security Policy at this time.

Short-Term Visitors
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Short-term visitors are supported to enable synthetic research on any aspect of evolutionary biology and relevant disciplines. Proposals can include any type of synthetic evolutionary project, but NESCent particularly welcomes collaborative projects. Such collaborations might include collaborations with NESCent in-house scientists or informaticians; joint proposals from two or more investigators to spend time together at NESCent; or proposals from leaders of working groups to work on their project with NESCent informatics staff.

Proposals should project an important evolutionary question, and should reflect NESCent's mission to facilitate synthesis and analysis of existing data. NESCent will not fund collection of new data or field research, but encourages the mining of public and private databases. Products might include (but are not restricted to) the following:

  1. Synthetic papers and reviews
  2. Databases allowing others to build on the visiting scientist's foundation
  3. Software or mathematical tools that solve a major analytical problem

NESCent is committed to making data, databases, software and other products that are developed as part of NESCent activities available to the broader scientific community. NESCent is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Duke University.

For more information: https://www.nescent.org/science/short_term_visitors.php

Deadline: July 01, 2009, September 01, 2009, January 01, 2010, April 01, 2010

Deadline note: Proposals for short-term visitors are considered four times a year, with deadlines on January 1, April 1, July 1 and September 1. Because of visa restrictions, international scholars should contact NESCent before applying.

Collaboration Support Program
National Forest Foundation (NFF)

The National Forest Foundation (NFF), chartered by Congress, engages America in community-based and national programs that promote the health and public enjoyment of the 193-million-acre National Forest System, and administers private gifts of funds and land for the benefit of the national forests. The NFF believes that communities should play a significant role in determining the future of the national forests and grasslands.

Population growth, development pressures, and rural and urban migration patterns are having a significant impact on the landscape. Rural, land-based communities are facing unprecedented challenges and many are recognizing the interrelationship between the health of their local natural resources, community, and economy. At the same time, natural resource issues can be contentious and heated, typified by distrust and deadlock. It is the belief of the National Forest Foundation, and many others, that one way to move past the controversy is to engage communities in dialogue-based collaborative processes to find common ground and develop proactive solutions.

The Collaboration Support Program (CSP) was developed with support from the Surdna Foundation to provide flexible funding to sustain existing collaborative efforts that have the potential to achieve significant ecological, social, and economic impact and move the field of collaboration forward. The Collaboration Support Program provides small grants to collaborative groups for organizational and technical assistance needs.

The Collaboration Support Program provides two types of small grants: Capacity Grants and Innovation Grants.

For more information:  http://nationalforests.org/conserve/grantprograms/capacitybuilding/csp

Deadline: August 07, 2009

Samuel Eliot Morison Naval History Scholarship
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Department of the Navy
Naval Historical Center

The Director Naval History is calling for applications for the Samuel Eliot Morison Naval History Supplemental Scholarship Program for the academic year 2009-2010. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote the development of a broad understanding of Naval History within the American national experience. Historical knowledge is an invaluable tool to place current issues in context and for leaders to make sound decisions. The scholarship provides a cash award to an officer of the United States Navy or United States Marine Corps with demonstrated leadership potential and high academic qualifications who is already pursuing graduate study in history, international relations, or a related field.

The scholarship is named in honor of the late Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, USNR, an eminent naval and maritime historian and winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

For more information: http://www.history.navy.mil/prizes/prize3.htm

Deadline: August 15, 2009

New Directions Grants
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Petroleum Research Fund (PRF)

The goals of the fund are the support of fundamental research in the petroleum and energy fields, and development of the next generation of engineers and scientists through support of advanced scientific education. The New Directions Grants aim to stimulate a new direction of research for established faculty, and to support the careers of their student scientists and engineers. This program replaces the previous PRF Type AC grant program. The emphasis of the grants is focused on providing funds for scientists and engineers who have very limited or even no preliminary results for a research project they wish to pursue with the intention of using the PRF-driven preliminary results to seek continuation funding from other agencies. The grants are to be used to illustrate proof of concept, that is, feasibility, and, accordingly, are to be viewed as seed money for new research ventures.

Fundamental research in the petroleum field is required as opposed to applied research or methods development. The following research topics will be supported.

  1. Synthetic organic chemistry: Synthetic organic methodology, organic and organometallic reagents and catalysts, asymmetric synthetic methods, green chemical synthesis.
  2. Geochemistry: Isotope geochemistry, organic and sedimentary geochemistry, marine geochemistry, diagenesis
  3. Inorganic chemistry: Coordination, organometallic, and bioinorganic chemistry as it relates to the petroleum field. Homogeneous catalysis, small soluble clusters, new ligands, main group, transition metal, and lanthanide and actinide metal chemistry.
  4. Physical organic chemistry: Reaction mechanisms, kinetics, photochemistry, organic radical chemistry, reactive organic species.
  5. Surface science: Surface science, heterogeneous catalysis, thin films, porous materials, adsorption and diffusion, AFM, STM, XPS, PES, CVD and related techniques.
  6. Chemical physics/physical chemistry: Chemical physics; theoretical chemistry including quantum/statistical mechanics, and molecular dynamics; optical, laser, ultrafast, and mass spectroscopies; and gas phase reactions
  7. Polymer science: Synthesis, characterization, and properties of polymers and dendrimers; organized media; and liquid crystals.
  8. Geology and geophysics: Stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleontology, geomorphology, structural geology, flow through porous media, geophysics.
  9. Chemical and petroleum engineering: Chemical and petroleum engineering studies, process and operations control and design, fluid flow and multiphase flow dynamics, and related computations.
  10. Materials science: Materials for efficient generation, storage or conversion of energy; synthesis, characterization, bulk properties, and solid-state chemistry of these materials.

For more information: https://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/memberapp?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_ARTICLEMAIN&node_id=1251&use_sec=false

Deadline: August 28, 2009

Deadline note: ACS PRF New Directions research proposals are considered at three Advisory Board meetings per year (early fall, mid-winter, and late spring), which are coordinated with the ACS Grants and Awards board meetings. The next application window is August 3, 2009, to August 28, 2009. These dates are subject to change.

Grants for Nuclear Security
Carnegie Corporation of New York
International Program

The corporation will address the concerns of nuclear security by supporting

  • policy relevant research and outreach to advance the further refinement and implementation of steps to reduce nuclear weapons and their proliferation risks;
  • policy relevant research and outreach on the proliferation risks of international reliance on nuclear energy and the options available to governments to reduce the risks; and
  • unofficial, multilateral policy discussions concerning North Korea and Iran.

For more information: http://www.carnegie.org/sub/program/international_program.html

Deadline: Continuous. The corporation accepts requests for funding at all times of the year; there are no application deadlines.

Research Participation Program for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (USARL)
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)
Postgraduate Opportunities

The Research Participation Program for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (USARL) provides opportunities to participate in USARL's on-going and applied research and development projects through its programs in Computational and Information Science, Human Research and Engineering, Survivability and Lethality Analysis, Sensors and Electron Devices, Weapons and Materials Research, and Vehicle Technology. The mission of USARL is to provide the Army the key technologies and the analytical support necessary to assure supremacy in future land warfare. Project areas disciplines include engineering, physics, chemistry, and material science.

For more information: http://www.orau.org/maryland/participants/arl_projects.htm

Deadline: Continuous. Applications are accepted and processed on a continuing basis.

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POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS

Postdoctoral Researchers and Research Associates
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Qualified postdoctoral researchers and research associates have the opportunity to participate in the laboratory's research and development programs, initiate new areas of research, and establish a base for ongoing collaborations through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Research Participant Program. People with new ideas and talents can contribute to research of mutual interest at NREL while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research.

The first category is Postdoctoral Researchers. This category is designed to provide recent (generally within three or fewer years) Ph.D. graduates with practical training in science and engineering. The qualified graduate will have demonstrated superior abilities and interest in research and development areas related to NREL's mission. Initial appointments are generally for one year. Extensions to these appointments may be granted based on programmatic need and funding availability to a maximum of three years.

The second category is Research Associates. This category provides scientists, engineers, and other professionals, generally with 4-12 years experience, opportunities to apply their training or specialized background to topics of research in the science and technology of renewable energy. Initial appointments range from one month to one year, and may be extended to a maximum of three years.

For more information: http://www.nrel.gov/employment/postdocs.html

Deadline: Continuous. Applications are accepted all year for possible placement and for specific open positions. The job openings page can be found at the following URL: http://www.nrel.gov/employment/job_openings.html

Systems Biology Fellowship Program
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

The completion of the human genome sequence as well as the genome sequences of other organisms has provoked both the challenge and the technical capabilities for understanding how the numerous, genome-coded cellular constituents function, both spatially and temporally, together within the living cell. This approach, called systems biology, requires a new type of scientist, who can work in multidisciplinary teams, handle large data sets, and use both biological and computational approaches. The Systems Biology Fellowship (SBF) Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is designed to train scientists at the postdoctoral level in this new discipline.

The SBF program will provide interactive, hands-on training at the postdoctoral level in the new discipline of systems biology. Postdoctoral training will include mentored research within multidisciplinary systems biology teams, the availability of advanced technologies at PNNL, and comprehensive training opportunities to complement the fellows' previous knowledge. Based on each fellow's specific background and training needs, workshops or formal courses in areas such as bioinformatics, computational biology, or molecular biology will be provided. A seminar course will introduce fellows to new findings in the area of systems biology and provide a forum for interaction between various laboratories engaged in systems biology on the PNNL campus.

Some of the SBF research areas include mechanisms of oxidative stress response, biological aging, carcinogenesis, understanding cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, spatial regulation of signal transduction, interrogative cell signaling, the role of post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions in cell signaling, environmental sensing in microbes, and microbial communities. Fellows will be able to utilize conventional and advanced research capabilities in solving complex biological problems.

Resources and technical capabilities include mass spectrometry and proteomics, computational biology and bioinformatics, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a variety of cell imaging capabilities.

For more information: http://www.sysbio.org/resources/education/postdoc.stm

Deadline: Continuous. Applications will be reviewed on a continual basis for appointments to coordinate with the annual November start date of the program.

Research Participation Program for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (USARL)
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)
Postgraduate Opportunities

The Research Participation Program for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (USARL) provides opportunities to participate in USARL's on-going and applied research and development projects through its programs in Computational and Information Science, Human Research and Engineering, Survivability and Lethality Analysis, Sensors and Electron Devices, Weapons and Materials Research, and Vehicle Technology. The mission of USARL is to provide the Army the key technologies and the analytical support necessary to assure supremacy in future land warfare. Project areas disciplines include engineering, physics, chemistry, and material science.

Multiple appointments are available at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (USARL) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The research topics may be similar to recent topics, including the following:

  1. Coordinate multifunctional projects that include research and development, and test and evaluation in a team environment
  2. Examine ceramic materials for a variety of military applications including armor and gun barrels
  3. Support during the experimental evaluation of ceramic materials to determine mechanical strength or toughness and physical density or hardness of the materials
  4. Multi-scale simulations of materials properties
  5. Research with intent to design and understand novel energy dissipative mechanisms for crosslinked polymer networks for next-generation protective materials
  6. Conduct basic research concerning material failure
  7. Learn basic techniques used to construct volumetric meshing of complex objects
  8. Develop and evaluate advanced ceramics for survivability and lethality applications
  9. Apply knowledge of ceramic processing/structure/property relationships and characterization of ceramic properties and failure mechanisms
  10. Analyze and study plant-based materials used in the production of fuel
  11. Develop novel formulations to enhance the mechanical, thermal, electrical, and mass transport properties for cross-linked polymer systems ranging in crosslink density from soft polymer gels to rubbers to rigid structural resins
  12. Introduce chemical additives and nanofillers into the resin formulation, as well as property characterization of the resulting cured materials
  13. Publish results in peer-reviewed journals and present the results at national and international technical conferences

For more information: http://www.orau.org/maryland/participants/arl_projects.htm

Deadline: Continuous. Applications are accepted and processed on a continuing basis.

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GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS

Translational Research re: Fragile X-associated Disorders (FXD)
National Fragile X Foundation

Each spring, the National Fragile X Foundation funds a number of William & Enid Rosen Summer Student Fellowships of $2,500 each. These grants are designed to encourage interest in Fragile X research while adding to the Fragile X body of knowledge. Both undergraduate and graduate students are eligible.

For more information: http://www.nfxf.org/html/request_for_application.htm

Deadline: April 20, 2009

CRILCQ Postdoctoral Fellowship - Universite de Monteal
Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur la Litterature et la Culture Quebecois (CRiLCQ)

The CRILCQ at Université de Montéal offers an award every two years to a researcher whose thesis has been accepted. The award allows the recipient to pursue postdoctoral research in the literature and culture of Quebec. The recipient will participate in the activities of CRILCQ (course and seminars, conferences, etc.), at the University of Montreal.

For more information:  http://www.crilcq.org/bourses/b_postdoc_crilcq_montreal.asp

Deadline:  May 31, 2009

Higher Education Research Experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for Students
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)
Graduate and Undergraduate Student Opportunities

Higher Education Research Experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HERE at ORNL) provides research opportunities and associated activities for students at all levels, beginning the term before college entrance through thesis/dissertation research, and higher education faculty. The program is designed to complement academic programs by utilizing the unique resources of Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enhance science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education, encourage careers in science and technology, and improve scientific literacy, while at the same time contributing to the Laboratory mission.

Applicants may be in the following disciplines, including computer science; earth, environmental, and marine sciences; engineering; life, health, and medical sciences; mathematics; and physical sciences. The opportunities are available in Tennessee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee).

For more information: http://see.orau.org/ProgramDescription.aspx?Program=10044

Deadline: Continuous. The program is always open for applications, but for best results, applicants should apply by February 1 for summer, June 1 for fall, and October 1 for winter/spring.

Laboratory-Graduate Research Appointments
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Laboratory-Graduate Research (Lab-Grad) appointments are available for qualified U.S. university graduate students who wish to carry out their thesis research at Argonne National Laboratory under co-sponsorship of an Argonne staff member and a faculty member. The university sets the academic standards and awards the degree. In practice, participation by the faculty member varies from full partnership in the research to general supervision of the student's thesis work. The Argonne staff sponsor undertakes to keep the faculty sponsor informed about the student's progress, and he/she attends the thesis defense.

Research may be conducted in the basic physical and life sciences, mathematics, computer science, and engineering as well as in a variety of applied research programs relating to energy, conservation, environmental impact and technology, nanomaterials, and advanced nuclear energy systems.

For more information: http://www.dep.anl.gov/p_graduate/labgrad.htm

Deadline: Continuous. An application for a Lab-Grad appointment may be submitted at any time during the year and an appointment may commence at any time. A completed application should be submitted at least one month prior to any proposed starting date but earlier application submission is advantageous because the availability of Lab-Grad appointments is limited by funding constraints.

Predoctoral Program
Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT)

The Chemical Industry Institute of Technology (CIIT) awards predoctoral fellowships to Ph.D. students at area universities whose programs mesh with on-going research projects. Predoctoral fellows conduct their dissertation research at CIIT. The staff scientist guiding the research serves on the student's doctoral committee and typically holds an adjunct faculty appointment at the university awarding the degree.

For more information: http://www.thehamner.org/education-and-outreach/pre-doctoral-program.html

Deadline: Continuous. Applications are accepted year-round.

Postgraduate Research Participation at the National Center for Toxicological Research
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)
Postgraduate Opportunities

This program offers opportunities to participate in research on biological effects of potentially toxic chemicals and solutions to toxicology problems that have a major impact on human health and the environment. Applicants should be working in the following discipline(s), including biological sciences, chemistry, computer sciences, mathematics, medicine, toxicology, pharmacology, and related scientific disciplines. The opportunities will be at the National Center for Toxicological Research (Jefferson, Arkansas).

The duration of the positions vary from one month to one year with renewal options; full-time or part-time appointments. The stipend will be based on research area(s) and educational level.

For more information: http://see.orau.org/ProgramDescription.aspx?Program=10112

Deadline: Continuous. Applications are accepted on a year-round basis.

Thesis-Parts Appointments
United States Department of Energy (DOE)
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. Department of Energy's major research centers, offers opportunities for qualified graduate students to carry on their master's or doctoral thesis research at the laboratory. Thesis Parts Appointments are for students who wish to perform only a portion of their dissertation research or to satisfy practicum requirements at Argonne. The work a student proposes must be related to work in progress at the laboratory and must require resources not available on campus.

For more information: http://www.dep.anl.gov/p_graduate/thesispa.htm

Deadline: Continuous. Applicants may apply at any time.

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UNDERGRADUATE  FELLOWSHIPS

Undergraduate Research (UR) Grants
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Petroleum Research Fund (PRF)

The goals of the fund are (1) the support of fundamental research in the petroleum and energy fields, and (2) development of the next generation of engineers and scientists through support of advanced scientific education. The Undergraduate Research (UR) Grants program supports the research programs of established scientists and engineers at non-doctoral research departments and provides financial support for students at those institutions - the next generation of scientists and engineers - to become involved in advanced investigative research activities, in preparation for continued study in graduate school or employment. This program replaces the previous PRF Type B grant program. The emphasis of the grants is to provide funding for scientists and engineers with established programs of research at non-doctoral departments. Demonstration of productivity is important, but a grant may also be used for a project with limited or no preliminary results in a new research area the PI wishes to pursue, with the intention of using the preliminary results obtained to seek continuation funding from other agencies. The research being proposed need not be comparable in volume and scope of research in doctoral settings, but it should be of publishable quality, and the research opportunities afforded the students must be of the highest caliber. PRF recognizes that undergraduate research is rarely central to the petroleum and alternative energy fields. Accordingly, research at the periphery of the petroleum and alternative energy fields is acceptable in the grants. A greater emphasis on advanced scientific education in the grants is thus necessary to fulfill the PRF Transfer Agreement. The principal investigator must demonstrate to the PRF Program Managers, Advisory Board members, and to the scientific or engineering community of reviewers that their proposals are designed with the participation of students as the essential feature. Poorly crafted proposals that are deemed to be "noncompetitive" will be denied without external review.

For more information: https://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/memberapp?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_ARTICLEMAIN&node_id=1251&use_sec=false

Deadline:  July 31, 2009

Deadline note:  ACS PRF type UR proposals are considered at two Panel meetings per year (January and June). The submission window for the January meeting is in July of the previous year. The submission window for the June meeting is January of the same year. The next application window is July 6, 2009, to July 31, 2009. These dates are subject to change.

Amount Note: Approximately 45 awards are made each year. Proposals may request a maximum of $65,000; all proposals are for three years. Only principal investigators in the United States may request a contribution to their summer salary, not to exceed $7,500 per grant year, including benefits, to a maximum of $22,500.

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Upcoming Limited Submission Program Internal Deadlines

  • Apr 14, 2009 - NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) - NSF 09-549
  • Apr 16, 2009 - Instrumentation for Materials Research - Major Instrumentation Projects (IMR-MIP) - NSF 09-547
  • Apr 23, 2009 - Chemistry Research Instrumentation and Facilities: Departmental Multi-user Instrumentation (CRIF:MU) - NSF 09-546
  • Apr 30, 2009 - Improvements to Biological Research Collections (BRC) - NSF 09-548
  • May 14, 2009 - Innovation through Institutional Integration (I3) - NSF 09-511

Get more information on Limited Submission Programs.

Limited Submission Process Changes

The Office of the Vice President for Research announces that the Limited Submission process has been automated. Effective December 10, 2007, submissions will be handled through the OVPR website on the Limited Submissions page.

Virginia Tech researchers interested in participating in the Limited Submission process can now do so electronically. After submitting a Notice of Intent on-line, researchers will automatically be notified about their status in the process. This information will include word that no competition exists and a submission can go forward to the funding agency or that an internal competition must be held and pre-proposals are required. At each stage of the Limited Submission process, researchers will receive e-mails keeping them abreast of various due dates, all in an effort to eliminate confusion and missed communications.

Other policies and procedures for Limited Submissions will remain the same except for those involving Tobacco Commission pre-proposals which have their own rules. Limited submissions will continue to be listed on the OVRP website calendar and in the Opportunity Update. The Limited Subs deadlines will also be available through RSS which can be subscribed to from the Limited Subs web page. If you have questions or problems with the new process, contact Beth Tranter at etranter@vt.edu or 540-231-1782.

Tagging for Efficient “Filing”

One of the newest features in COS Funding Opportunities, tagging and sharing funding records, can also be one of the most useful — especially to anyone who searches for funding for others. When you find a good opportunity, you can simply track the record to your COS Workbench and tag it with whatever labels suit you. Then just click to sort on a tag and click again to share all records with that tag. (See the October 25 COS Newsletter for more information).

Tagging is becoming a common feature on many social websites, such as del.icio.us, where users share bookmarks, and Flick'r, which allows users to share images, and other sites where users can comment on or share information.

What makes tags different from other labels or keywords is that they are entirely up to the user--there are no preset lists you must choose from. So you can give a record tags that are meaningful to you, even if not to someone else.

If an opportunity is appropriate for the whole neuroscience department, offers a large amount of money, but the application paperwork will be unusually laborious, you might use tags like these: neuro, big-money, ugh.

If another opportunity might be appropriate for Dr. Kyte, Dr. Thompson and Dr. Smith, but will require an internal competition, you might use these tags: Smith, Thompson, Kyte, compet.

There are some guidelines to remember about tags:

  • Tags are separated by spaces, so you cannot include a space in your tag
  • Tags can include periods (.), underscores (_) and hyphens (-), so you can have multi-part tags by using these symbols. For example, you can tag something with "thompson_primary" but not "thompson primary".

If you haven't already tried tracking, tagging and sharing funding records, go ahead and give it a try. Once you get used to assigning tags and develop your own personal system, I'm sure you will find this an invaluable feature in managing your funding search.

 
 
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